Hints on cutting sonotube?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Chuck Bogie, Jul 24, 2003.

  1. Chuck Bogie

    Chuck Bogie Second Unit

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    Adire sez I should get the Tempest Real Soon Now (have the shipping info via e-mail - I like those guys...). Gonna go pick out some tube - I'm going to try to find it close to 23 3/4" in inside diameter, since the pre-cut circles at Home Despot are that size, and give it a liberal application of cement. The circles are going to screwed and glued to a 27" square piece of 3/4" MDF for top and bottom.

    So, since we've gotta buy 12' of the stuff, we're also going to experiment with several different sizes of enclosures. What's the best way to get a good square cut on it? And how do you guys suggest "sealing" the edges?
     
  2. Jeremy Stockwell

    Jeremy Stockwell Supporting Actor

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    Chuck,

    Check Patrick Sun's Sunosub I as well as similar techniques used on II and III to see the technique that worked for me.

    Patrick's web pages should be required reading for anyone building a sonotube-based sub. He also documents his procedure for sealing the seams from the inside of the tube (See "blind man caulking").

    JKS
     
  3. Jeff Meininger

    Jeff Meininger Second Unit

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    Wrapping some gift-wrap paper around the tube is a great way to get a straight line. I did this, and then CAREFULLY followed along the edge of the wrapping paper with a sharpie.

    Once you have your cut-line drawn use a jig saw to SLOWLY, CAREFULLY follow your line. Haste makes waste.

    http://boxybutgood.com/temp/sonosub/SubDAY1-002.jpg

    Little stringies will form as you cut. They are annoying and make it difficult to tell if you are following the line correctly or not. Do your best, and when you're finished and have pulled the stringies off, it'll probably be pretty straight.
     
  4. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    One way to get a very clean/square cut is to install the end cap to the proper length, then use a flush trim router bit to 'cut' the tube to length
     
  5. Joe Tilley

    Joe Tilley Supporting Actor

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    I use the paper around the tube trick like mentioned & find it works very well. As for sealing I put a small radius with a round over bit on the inside of the caps. Before I put them in I use a thin bead of liquid nails spread around the inner edge of the tube, than put them in place. After there level with the tube edge I put a few screws in to hold it in place than put a line of liquid nails into the grove between the cap & tube & smooth it over with my finger. Works pretty good, I tried to get one back out after it dried & it just wasn't happening, I ended up having to cut the tube & peeling the remaining tube from the cap.
     
  6. warrick

    warrick Stunt Coordinator

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    I did the paper thingy to get a line then cut it with a jigsaw, once the tub had the endcaps glued and screwed I did the router bit it came out real neat

    Warrick
     
  7. Vince Bray

    Vince Bray Stunt Coordinator

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    do the paper wrapping trick, but to mark it, simply shoot some black spray paint at the line. makes it very easy to follow the line and very accurate.
     

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