Higher Power consumption=more power?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kyle_Y, Nov 25, 2001.

  1. Kyle_Y

    Kyle_Y Stunt Coordinator

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    If a receiver or amp consumes more power (amps or watts) than another receiver or amp, does this mean that the output will be higher? Say two receivers are rated at 5x100w, but one consumes 4.5 amps while the other consumes 5.5 amps, will it make a difference? I think this slight difference may make a difference. The Onkyo and Denon receivers for example, as they get mroe expensive, the use mroe amps. If the power concumption does make a difference, is it a big difference?
     
  2. Bob_Hammond

    Bob_Hammond Agent

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    I'm not an expert here, but I think that in general more amps is good. I think that it is kind of like weight. A heavier receiver is not always better, but cheap receviers tend to be light.

    Bob
     
  3. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    Doesn't that have something to do with the efficiency of the amp as well. If an amp draws a lot of amps, but is very inefficient most of that current draw will just get changed into heat. If it is very efficient then most of the current it draws will get sent to the speakers.

    I'm not EE so I'm not sure on this.

    But my best guess from limited undertstanding then is, shouldn't you only be comparing amp numbers on similar class amps. Like a class A (or which ever one of A or B is less efficient) would need to draw a lot more current than a class D would to get the same amount of watts to the speaker?
     

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