Helped Dad install his DISH yesterday. (also titled: Attack of the killer bees!)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matt_Stevens, Aug 28, 2001.

  1. Matt_Stevens

    Matt_Stevens Supporting Actor

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    Yes, bees. Lots of them in a hive in a vent on the roof of his house and when he bumped into it, those f***ers launched! It was a miracle he got outta there without a stinger somewhere on his body. [​IMG]
    Anyway, we spent pretty much all day installing the system. Wiring was the hardest part. Homes that are built now are pre-wired, but this one was built in the 70's, so some holes were made to help us. I am sure mom will approve [​IMG]
    My only concern is the system being grounded. My dad put the cables into the attic, into the ground pieces against the attack wall and then ran the ground wire through the wall, down the side of the house. Is it OK to do this? The directions stated to do this outside, but there was no place for him to screw the ground bracket down outside.
    The system was bought from Dishdepot.com just hours before they raised their prices by over a $100. He got the 6000 receiver, the two dishes, plus a second standard receiver for the bedroom for $450.00.
    His TV is an old 27" Zenith and has geometry problems from a surge years ago, but I was still amazed at how crystal clear and grain free the picture was, once the channels came on. It also looks grand in his bedroom on the 20". My mother is all excited about the Home Garden Channel and my dad is going nuts because he can finally watch both the History Channel and Bill O'Reilly.
    I am curious as to what DISH would look like at my place on my 47" Panasonic HDTV and am going to try and make my landlord commit to allowing me to get this system (professionally installed, of course). Since my girlfriend lives in Stamford CT, which qualifies for the NYC Networks and CBS-HD, I will, of course, be using that as my physical address and my home as my billing. [​IMG] You gotta do what you gotta do. I, for one, want SURVIVOR in the upconverted HDTV!
    ------------------
    www.deceptions.net/superman
     
  2. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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  3. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

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    The groundwire from your mast/dish should stay outside, and be as straight as possible into the ground. This is to reduce the liklihood of fire, should the dish be struck by lightning. An incredible amount of energy will pass through this wire if it is hit, and any insulation or other flammable building materials in contact with the wire may catch fire. The best / most secure method for mast grounding is to run the groundwire through standoffs mounted to the house, down to the grounding rod.
    Alternatively, insulated staples can be used to attach the wire directly to the structure. (I used this method, and I actually have small scorch marks on the house under the wire from a strike a couple years back).
    The coax ground can be anywhere you like, and is not designed for arresting lightning. This ground is for discharge of static energy from the wind blowing over the dish, etc...
    You should also consider a power / coaxial surge /spike supressor for where your receiver is plugged in. The good ones have a lightning guarantee.
    -Scott
     
  4. Matt_Stevens

    Matt_Stevens Supporting Actor

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