Help With New HT

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Jason Ole, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. Jason Ole

    Jason Ole Extra

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    Hello,

    I'm currently planning for my 1st/new home theater and am asking for any comments/help. I'm building a 26x30 addition with MBR/BA and walk-in closet and HT room. The HT room will be 22x12 with a small office/desk in back. I'm running a 5.1 setup and may do 6.1 later. I know I should run 2 wires to each location for speakers, put down some sort of subfloor before the carpet.

    But not sure about:
    Seating/on budget (use risers?)
    Ideas for new TV ~$1000-$1500 (no ceiling projector/nixed by wife)
    Other wiring should run through walls?

    Any comments appreciated, even if it seems obvious.

    Thanks!
    Jason
     
  2. KenA

    KenA Stunt Coordinator

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    I would recommend running cat5 and RG6 (2 each) through your walls to a distribution point. Are you setting up an equipment closet? There are a lot of wires you can run, including IEEE1394 and fiber, for future upgrades, but the best thing would be to install a 3" PVC pipe between your equipment and TV location (if they're not next to each other of course) so that you can run any wires you need later.
     
  3. Jason Ole

    Jason Ole Extra

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    Thanks for the reply Ken

    What are cat5, RG6, IEEE1394 and fiber used for? I planned on having an equipment closet on one side of the monitor and DVD/video storage on the other. Also thought of adding a "alley" behind the monitor wall for easy access.
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Cat-5 is for computer networking, and/or to get high-speed DSL service from the phone company. You would want that run to the back where the office/desk is, assuming you’ll have a computer there. You might want to drop a phone line there, too.

    RG-6 is coaxial cable used for RF signals. It’s used for cable TV service, and feeds from satellite dishes. You might want to drop one of those at the desk too, in case you want hi-speed internet from your local cable provider.

    If you plan on using a satellite dish in your HT room you’ll want RG-6 and a phone line dropped in the equipment room for the receiver.

    Of course, making the drops in your room is only half the story. The other half is running and tying them tied onto the service.

    Other in wall wiring you might need is a coaxial line to the location where the sub will be. While you’re at it, have an electrical outlet put in there, too. It should be tied into the same circuits as the rest of the equipment. You are putting in dedicated service for the system, right?

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  5. Jim_Ski

    Jim_Ski Agent

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    Since the price is negligable, go with Cat6 vs. Cat5 (or Cat5e). "It's one louder, isn't it."

    If you run two lines, one can carry your phone line if desired . (actually up to 4 phone lines as ethernet cable is 4-pair wire)

    Keep in mind these wires should be "home run", meaning that they all go from the drop location directly to a central spot (hub).

    Running fiber optical cable is optional, but as it's relatively inexpensive it's not a terrible idea (though terminating it will add up very fast as you'll need either a) very expensive tools or more likely b) hire somebody to terminate it) I ran it, and left it un-terminated as a future-proof peace-of-mind deal.

    as for the other cables, I agree with running 2-cat6 and 2-RG6 to each drop. I'd run a set to where your equipment will be, your tv (unless you're doing a projector), your desk, your bedroom, etc etc (keep in mind I work with computers and may be a tad more gung-ho than typical)

    Lastly, don't forget to run cables (RG6) from your equipment to your tv/projector. I nearly skipped this after literally a mile of cable. Doh!

    PS if you want a tv signal in the bathroom, now's the time to consider that as well. [​IMG]
     
  6. Jason Ole

    Jason Ole Extra

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    Wow, this is the info I was looking for! Thanks very much for all the replies.

    Cat5, duh! I'm a webmaster/graphic designer, should have known that cat5 is for networking, "I am ashamed".

    As far as RG6, I don't have cable access, I can only get satellite out here so to put it by the desk wouldn't be helpful in my case, I don't think. I can get DSL run through the phone line.

    What does the coax run on the sub? My current sub doesn't run coax, do the new ones?

    Good thinking on the signal in the bath!
     
  7. Conrad Ebel

    Conrad Ebel Agent

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    Coax provides a very good shielded cable for the non-amplified sub signal. Amplified signals aren't as suseptable to interferance as non-amplified signals. The RG6 cable has great shielding and is pretty cheap.
     
  8. Wayne_H

    Wayne_H Auditioning

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    Possible dumb question, but I'll ask anyway. What's the RG-6 from components to projector used for?

    Thx!
     
  9. Conrad Ebel

    Conrad Ebel Agent

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    OTA broadcast? Yikes! [​IMG]
     
  10. Jason Ole

    Jason Ole Extra

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    I'll pose another stupid question:

    The coax is being used without the "tv connector" on the end to plug into the inputs on the sub? Just used for better conductivity and shielding?
     
  11. Conrad Ebel

    Conrad Ebel Agent

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    Home Depot has adapters that change the "F" (not sure if this is what it's called, the one for your old TV) style cable end to an RCA cable end. I think you can also just get an RCA end that you can put on the end of a RG6 cable (I think I saw those at Home Depot). Anyway, just go to Home Depot and get something that will do what you need. The RG6 cable for your sub is a good thing though. You'll get a very clean sub signal.
     
  12. Conrad Ebel

    Conrad Ebel Agent

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    Yes. The pre-amp signal coming from you reciever is NOT amplified. As that travels through your room, the signal can be easily damaged by all sorts of "line noise". The RG6 cable provieds a nice shield for this signal.

    Regular speakers aren't really affected by this because their signals are already amplified.
     
  13. mark_landy

    mark_landy Auditioning

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    Same Q -

    I have gone through the FAQ and all the beginner posts I could find - lots of info here.

    I have ordered a few books from Amazon - but does anyone have good reference plans / drawings and parts lists ?
     

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