Help with changing computers

Discussion in 'Computers' started by John Wilson, Oct 31, 2004.

  1. John Wilson

    John Wilson Supporting Actor

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    Hi.
    I have a scenario that I would like some clarification on. I have an older computer running an activated XP PRO OS. I have alot of programs and peripherials attached to it but it is slow and somewhat unstable. I've acquired another computer (no OS) that will have a blank, formatted drive that I would like to use as its replacement. Ideally, I'd like to run them side-by-side to ensure that everything transfers over to the new machine but I've only got the one OS. Can I load it onto the new machine at the same time that its running on the old one? How does MS's activation work in this scenario? Do I have to call MS to get permission? I'm not planning to use the old box once the new one is up and running.

    Thanks for your help. [​IMG]
     
  2. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    So. . . per the end-user agreement one and only one computer can ever operate off any given liscense at a time. Microsoft controls this by creating an activation code based off the hardware in your computer which is then associated with your liscense.

    If you want to legally run both computers at the same time your going to have to buy a second copy. When you install windows onto your new computer your going to have to call microsoft and jump through hoops for a while to get a new code for your new computer.

    Sad part is that all this doesn't stop people from getting and using illegal copies, it just creates more hassles or those that want to be legit.
     
  3. Bobby McGee

    Bobby McGee Extra

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    I'm not exactly clear on your plan of attack, however, windows gives you 30 days to activate the copy. You can run it fully functioning for that time so loading - transferring will not be a problem.
     
  4. Patrick_L

    Patrick_L Second Unit

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    what exactly are you "transferring" over? not a good idea to do that with programs.
     
  5. John Wilson

    John Wilson Supporting Actor

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    What I am hoping to do is transfer "functionality", i.e. I have multiple peripherals like a printer, scanner, PDA,and MP3 players that are not just plug and play. The SW installs are "involving" with the driver updates, etc. I also would like to switch to Mozilla without losing my Favorites and emails from OE and IE.

    Are you saying that I can't install the same OS onto the new computer, even for 30 days, while I bring the new system up to the current functionality of the old one? If I "decommission" the old system, can't I legally use the purchased XP PRO OS on the new one?

    I guess I'm getting confused as to what MS will allow and what they won't. [​IMG]
     
  6. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    What's suggested is that windows, on a new installation, will still operate normally for 30 days and just nag you to activate it. So put windows on the new computer, transfer everything over in this 30 day period and then remove windows from the old computer and finally call micrsoft to do the license transfer work.

    It's technically against the end-user agreement, but you'd have to go and irk the right people before anyone would care.
     

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