Help! Video Switching Questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Fran_T, Nov 29, 2001.

  1. Fran_T

    Fran_T Auditioning

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    Due to the limited number of progressive scan ports on the Sony rear projection TV I bought I am in the market for an A/V Receiver that will do component video switching. (I will run an HDTV capable SAT receiver and my Progressive Scan DVD player into the receiver and out to the TV) I am not an audio/video-file. If anyone can answer these questions I would appreciate it.

    1 - I have heard that Onkyo, Denon and Yamaha brands afford the least signal degradation for Video Switching. Is this true? If one runs a Kenwood and Onkyo side-by-side can the naked eye differentiate between the two? Or, is this a difference so minute only a scope can catch it?

    2 - The (single) progressive scan video port on the TV has both component video (Yg, Pb, Pr) and HD/VD jacks. I have yet to find an A/V Receiver with HD/VD output jacks. Will using just the Yg, Pb, and Pr jacks (and not the HD/VD jacks) produce a lower quality picture as compared to the HD/VD jacks?

    3 - Anyone had any experience with Kenwood A/V Receivers in general and the VR-510 in particular? Good/Bad? How's the video switching signal degradation?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. SamRoza

    SamRoza Stunt Coordinator

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    My experience, Fran, is that most receivers will do the necessary video switching with no trouble...unless it's like the Marantz line and has bug which make video switching near unwatchable.

    Just my take on the subject, I don't use Component, so I can't give you really good examples.

    Sam
     
  3. Rik P

    Rik P Stunt Coordinator

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    I have the VR-510 and found out from Crutchfield that the component bandwith on the receiver is 10 mhz. Im not sure what exactly HD is but i know its higher than 10mhz? Please correct me if im wrong.

    I have enough inputs on my TV (MITS) so i choose not to take any chances with switching video.
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    You need 7 MHz video bandwidth for regular DVD, 14 MHz for progressive scan, and 37 MHz for HDTV. You could get away with 25 MHz for 1080i but there would be noticeable softening of the picture on 720p.
    Insufficient bandwidth shows up first as small dots or narrow details not being as narrow as they should be (loss of horizontal resolution).
    Other video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  5. SamRoza

    SamRoza Stunt Coordinator

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    Aah, I see I was wrong with Component video. I apologize if I've misled anyone.

    Sam
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Fran. Welcome to HTF!

    Several months ago, a HDTV Insider newsletter did some tests and found that many receivers that switch Component video fine, did not have the bandwidth to correctly switch HD signals. This was using 1999 models and they found that only the flagship receivers (Yamaha RX-V1, Dennon 5800, etc.) that promised Component switching handled HD properly.

    So just because a receiver switches Component, dont assume it will switch HD correctly.

    (Note: It takes measuring equipment to see the problems, and the problems only affect the higher-frequency signals. So you CAN get away with it.)

    So if you put 2 different receivers side-by-side, could you see any difference?

    Well, I think it really depends on how demanding the rest of your system is. Take these 2 systems for example:

    System A: 40" HD RPTV with short (less than 6') cables between the TV and receiver.

    System B: 100" Projection system with 40' run between the projector and the receiver.

    I think you would not see any difference with System A, but you could/would see differences with System B.

    Since you are searching for a new receiver with an eye to HD video switching, you should make sure that the receiver says "HD Video Switching" somewhere in the spec sheet. Since Yamaha, Onkyo, Dennon are all fairly repuitable companies, you can trust them.

    But even from these good companies, I'd avoid receivers that dont specify "HD" in the spec sheet.

    Hope this helps.
     
  7. Fran_T

    Fran_T Auditioning

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    To all...WOW! My first post and I received sooo much valuable information. Thanks to everyone on this thread...I *REALLY* appreciate it. I will stick with the high-end receivers and look specifically for HD switching.

    Lastly, just a question about the connectors. The (single) progressive scan video port on the TV has both component video (Yg, Pb, Pr) and HD/VD jacks. I have yet to find an A/V Receiver with HD/VD output jacks. Will using just the Yg, Pb, and Pr jacks (and not the HD/VD jacks) produce a lower quality picture as compared to the HD/VD jacks?

    THanks again to all for helping a neophyte!

    Fran
     
  8. Kit_C

    Kit_C Extra

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  9. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Fran: I dont think you need to look at the high-end to get HD switching.

    Yamaha for one has swapped out nearly its entire receiver line this year and one of the few improved features on some of them is "HD Video switching". I thought I saw this on something like a $800 receiver a few weeks back. So I dont think you need a $1,500+ unit to get this feature.
     
  10. Fran_T

    Fran_T Auditioning

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    I found more information so I thought I would post it here. I went to Denon's web page.

    The spec sheet for the AVR5800 says,

    "High-performance relays provide wideband component video bandwidth (>50 Mhz), compatible with progressive DVD(480p), as well as HDTV formats (720p, 1080i)."

    Of course, I cannot afford that receiver. I looked at the other receivers on the web page. The majority of the other A/V Receivers (particularly the AVR2802, which suits my budget) do not specify the high performance relays or bandwidth in their spec sheets.

    However, for the other receivers (AVR2802) they do say this on the initial product description web page. "2 sets component video inputs, compatible with wideband (480p, 720p, 1080i) response for progressive DVD, DTV"

    This sounds promising and I would think Denon means that both input *AND* output are wideband. I wonder how I can confirm this?

    BTW I am looking for an A/V receiver primarily because I need to get both a (future) HDTV Satellite Receiver and Progressive Scan DVD into the singular wideband port on my television. Also, my existing receiver is old and only supports Dolby Pro Logic...no 5.1,etc. If you have a suggestion for an A/V Receiver that will suit my needs please let me know.

    Thanks again.

    Fran
     

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