Help this dummy understand carpeting.

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Drew Bethel, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. Drew Bethel

    Drew Bethel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 1999
    Messages:
    1,209
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Live in Minnesota and would like to replace my basement carpet with something inexpensive but easy on the eyes and durable. I was over at a bud's house and he had some type of Berber carpeting. I spoke with his dealer who offered me a price of $0.90 p/sq.ft to cover a ~$500 sq.ft area.

    My friend has 8lb padding left over from his installation that he will give to me for free - it should be enough.

    Am I missing anything? We run a humidifier in the basement during the summers so I want to avoid plush carpets. The basement also serves as my home theatre and will be a play area for the kids. Menards is has a special on Dreamfied Berber Woven Back Carpet for $0.95 p/sqft. Is this a good deal? How is woven back better or worse than others? Thanks.

    PS. I also plan to rip up and dispose of the carpet myself to keep the cost down. Any tips/advise on this is also appreciated.
     
  2. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2000
    Messages:
    3,813
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0


    Duct tape a 1 ft square piece of plastic or aluminum foil to your floor and leave it for 24 hours. If any moisture shows up under the plastic/foil you may need to address that before you put down carpeting.

    You might want to seal the floor with Drylock either way just to be safe.
     
  3. Al.Anderson

    Al.Anderson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2002
    Messages:
    2,591
    Likes Received:
    80
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Al
    Woven (or jute) back carpet is more suceptible to moisture damage and distortion (those bumps/ripple) than foam back. The test Dave gives is good, but I'd also be worried about the conditions after a rain.

    As for removing the carpet, it's a good cost saver idea unless the current stuff is glued foam. Then removal could be a PITA and possibly worth paying for if you have the cash at all. If it jute, just use a carpet blade and cut 4 foot strips and remove the strips. Your installation should include new tackless strip, so yank out the old stuff unless it's in great shape (no moisture damage and all the pins upright).

    On the flip side, if you do decide to go with foam, you don't need the padding, and installing it yourself is even easier than installing jute back.

    On the other-other hand, you'll get better sound absorption from the padding/jute combo.

    Also, when you say you can get padding left over from a friend's installation, I assume you mean new padding. (I have to ask since that's a lot of padding to have left over.) Never use old padding on a new carpet install; new padding will extend the life of your carpet. Plus they tend to age at the same rate, so at somepoint you'll have worn out padding with still decent carpet.
     
  4. Drew Bethel

    Drew Bethel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 1999
    Messages:
    1,209
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the tips. Yes, the padding was new but I just found out from Menards that the padding is free with the carpet purchase. It's the 8lb padding - that's very good padding, right?
     
  5. Drew Bethel

    Drew Bethel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 1999
    Messages:
    1,209
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Geez, no diy guys around huh?
     
  6. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2001
    Messages:
    552
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Padding makes a huge difference in how nice the carpet feels under your feet. They should have samples of other padding that you can buy. It's up to you to decide if it's worth the extra money.
     
  7. JonZ

    JonZ Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 1998
    Messages:
    7,798
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    0
    "Duct tape a 1 ft square piece of plastic or aluminum foil to your floor and leave it for 24 hours. If any moisture shows up under the plastic/foil you may need to address that before you put down carpeting.

    You might want to seal the floor with Drylock either way just to be safe."

    Great advice. Even though I dont have moisture problems, wen I finish my basement Im sealing it - better safe than sorry.

    I installed Carpet for years.My 2 cents.

    If money isnt a object get a berberplush mix carpet. Thats just my opinion. I hate berber.

    90cents a sq foot? Look at the carpet. Is it woven tightly together? Or can you see space between the strands/fabric? If its woven tightly, its a decent carpet.IF you can pull them apart and theres alot of space between them,and alot of the backin gis exposed thats not good. (sorry Im having a hard time explainging this)

    Also one mistake people buy is they get very good carpet and cheap padding. Something else people used to do so save money where carpet on concrete is concerned is the leave down the previous carpet and use it as the padding,cutting around it for the tackless(As long as the carpet isnt soiled)

    One thing to remember about berber-especially if it is a play area for kids and such.If/when they snag it, whole rows come up - leaving a huge runs in the carpet.

    My advice, is to put down area rugs on top of the carpet.You can get remnants bound around the edges for very little. I did this so it doesnt leave indentations from furniture and long pieces to walk on.

    Its just a idea to help make the carpet look a bit nicer and last longer.
     

Share This Page