Help Please!!!!! Advice wanted on these choices for a widescreen tv

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Gary_O, Aug 16, 2002.

  1. Gary_O

    Gary_O Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am looking at for essentially the same price give or take a hundred or two these 3 widescreen tv's


    Toshiba 65"
    Sony 57"
    Hitachi 57"

    These are the 3 new models that have came out at Best Buy and Circuit City in the last few weeks. Anyone have any thoughts or info on any of them? I am sorta leaning toward either the Hitachi or the Toshiba, but the only reason I'm really leaning toward the Toshiba is so that I can get the larger screen for essentially the same price


    Also, Is it worth it to buy the 4 year extended service plan for the extra $300 or $400 ????

    Any comments would be appreciated
     
  2. todd s

    todd s Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 1999
    Messages:
    7,133
    Likes Received:
    76
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Gary, You might want to make sure what Toshiba 65" you are getting. Their is a 65H82 and the 65HDX82. The HDX82 is a little harder to find. But, has the DVI hookup built in. The H82 is upgradeable to the hookup but for a undisclosed fee. The HDX also has a color filter that helps the picture.
     
  3. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 27, 2002
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Of the three you have asked about, the Toshibas are all very nice sets. They tend to be (in my opinion) one step up from the other two you mentioned (he says, putting on his asbestos suit).

    When I devoted three months to researching and shopping this past spring, my final three choices were the Toshiba, the Mits, and the Pioneer Elites. The Toshiba was eliminated finally because of two minor issues... the "upconversion" it does on the DVDs (which cannot be shut off), and the reported problems with "ghosting." Still, these were minor issues overall, some cannot even detect the flaws mentioned. And, the toshibas have a LOT of things going for them (including one of the best strecth modes on the market for 4 X 3 signals at 480i).

    The above is only my opinion, but I did a lot of reading from those who had bought the products, as well as every review I could get my hands on.

    The second question you asked is a tougher one. In general, those extended warranties are NOT worth it. I have read many articles where the math was spelled out, in great detail, and they simply do not make economic sense. I knew that, and have said "no" to them for the past 12 years. That said, I actually coughed up this one time, and I did purchase a five year extended warranty for my set (a Mits). Why? It was a combination of factors... there ARE things that can go wrong with these that can necessitate a major repair bill (in excess of $700 or even $1000). That is usually not the case with most other appliances and items we buy (VCRs, DVD players, amps, speakers, even washers, dryers, dishwashers, etc.) And, my negotatiations managed to secure the additional five year for only an additional $199.99 (although the dealer originally was asking $350 for the same 5 year). So, at that price, knowing I could get bitten with a bad repair bill, I went ahead. Finally, I just wanted that silly feeling of security, even though I know it is silly.

    Even though I knew that something like 91% of all problems are evident out of the box, and the next 4% are evident within the first 30 days, and the next 2 % show up within the first year, which is all covered anyway, and that only leaves a tiny fraction of problems, and those are USUALLY fixed with a minor service call... I went ahead and bought. And, even though I know they manage to exclude many of the things which CAN result in a big-ticket repair bill (like screen "burn-in," which is NOT covered, and can result in a $1000 plus repair bill, since you must replace the CRTS, and screen burn-in is never covered), I still bought. And, I would do it again, today. Just this "once."

    So, I (for once) went against my economic sense, and I bought. I do feel a bit more secure.

    -Bruce in Chi-Town
     
  4. Gary_O

    Gary_O Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I looked and the Toshiba 65" is in fact the H82 model and the Hitachi 57" is the SWX20B model.
     
  5. Michael Silla

    Michael Silla Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2001
    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Personally, I prefer the Hitachi's. When I was shopping it came down to the Mits 55819 or the Hits 53UWX10B. I didn't really care for the Toshiba and it's stretch modes. I never really considered the Sony's.

    My two cents.

    Michael.
     
  6. Roby Adams

    Roby Adams Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1999
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  7. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2001
    Messages:
    211
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What Bruce was talking about is not exactly line doubling; line doubling is the creation of a progressive image from an interlaced source. What he is referring to is that the TV takes the 480 line progressive signal it receives from the DVD player (or that it creates using its internal line doubler) and scales it up - or adds lines to the image - to 540p. I believe both the Toshibas and the Hitachis do this.

    The manufacturers claim this better matches the output of the CRTs (the CRTs can display 1080i, which is the same amount of scanned lines as 540p), and therefore will look better, which is reasoning I do not understand. Usually more lines means a better picture, but the TV is creating 60 lines (more than 10%) of the image out of thin air. Despite what Toshiba and Hitachi claim, it is commonly accepted that a DVD looks better in its "native" 480p than it does upconverted to 540p.
     
  8. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 27, 2002
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Roby:

    Regarding your question...

    Toshiba HD-ready monitors take all incoming 480i and 480p signals and upconvert these to 540p. There is no way to shut this "feature" off. Some, including Toshiba, argue that it results in an improvement. Others (including myself) would argue that this results in an unavoidable slight "softening" of the high-frequency parts of the image. Admittedly, this is a very slight softening. This issue and the ghosting have been widely discussed and debated, on this forum and also elsewhere. A search on the word "Upconvert" or "unconversion" will yield LOTS of discussion, if you are curious.

    Bruce in Chi-Town
     
  9. Roby Adams

    Roby Adams Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1999
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  10. Vlad D

    Vlad D Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    1,076
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Vladimir Derenoncourt
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the Toshiba 540p upconvert started with last years H81 and HX81 series. I don't think it existed before.
     
  11. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,756
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Vlad is correct, the TW56X81 did not have the 540p conversion. It will display a native 480p.

    This conversion, according to Michael TLV does incur some loss of fine detail, but many owners don't notice it. According to him, the Hitachi sets that do the conversion do not lose nearly as much fine detail.

    Sony sets do not do this conversion.
     

Share This Page