Help! New speaker wires have oxidation....

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeff D, Aug 22, 2002.

  1. Jeff D

    Jeff D Supporting Actor

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    I reciently upgraded my speaker wire to the sound king wire from parts express. This was roughly 3 months ago. Last night I was working on the back of the reciever and I noticed the green oxidation buildup inside the new speaker wire.

    All wires were cut, stripped, and fitted to a bananna plug (screwed in the wire for max contact area). I then tinned the ends.

    I've never had any problems in the past with cheap speaker wire or even the monster speaker wire I use on the mains.

    Was there something I should have done to prevent this oxidation? What could I have done? Or is this wire just more prone to oxidation? Could the way I tinned the wire have an effect?
     
  2. David*RT

    David*RT Stunt Coordinator

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    Copper oxidizes (especially if you live in a humid area). That's as sure as sure as daylight.

    For this reason, most cables come with opaque sheathing to hide the ultimate oxidation that will occur over time.

    There are ways to minimize it such as buying ultra-high pure oxygen-free copper (i.e. 6N).

    You could also buy silver-plated cables which would help with oxidation. Actually oxidized silver is a good conductor.

    If you can, return the cable to the manufacturer and ask for a replacement. Maybe very likely it came that way from the store......
     
  3. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    the green color is reaction with chloride possibly from some PVC monomer. its apparently normal but may be mitigated by the enviroment you live in. increasing the purity of the copper will have no effect on its tendency to react with oxygen, chloride, or atmospheric pollutants. I posted the following in another thread but i'll repost it here. The thinking is similar.
    Dear Sir:
    The phenomenon you have described is normal with the Carol(R) 12 gauge speaker cable (P/N 1364) in that the copper will turn green over time. This is nothing to be concerned about as the audio performance will not be affected. If you prefer a cable with a less reactive jacket compound, I
    recommend Carol(R) C1463 which is slightly less flexible, but carries a UL CL2 rating for in-wall use.
    Regards,
    Alben Roland
    Engineering Team Leader
    General Cable Corporation
    4 Tesseneer Drive
    Highland Heights, KY 41076
    * Phone: 859.572.8754
    * Fax: 859.572.8447
    * E-mail: [email protected]
    -----Original Message-----
    From: ****
    Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2002 8:24 AM
    To: [email protected]
    Subject: Question Regarding the Carol Speaker Cable
    Several individuals I know have bought Carol 12 gauge copper speaker wire at HomeDepot. Several of these people have noticed that after a period of time, the wire that's beneath the PVC insulation has turned green presumably from
    the formation of Copper Chloride, perhaps from PVC degradation or unreacted monomer. Is this a normal phenomenon with the Carol wire or should this be looked upon as defective product? What can General Cable tell me about
    this?
     
  4. Jeff D

    Jeff D Supporting Actor

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    OK, I wasn't sure it was bad for the signal or not. I'd guess that it might.

    I know copper oxidation is normal, but I was wondering if there is a way to prevent the oxidation. After all, oxidation is breaking down the material it oxidizes.

    I could was just thinking I should refinish the ends with oxidation.
     
  5. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    well it's not oxidation, that is a reaction product with oxygen. this is a reaction product with chlorine, hence the green color. the thing is you don't see it if the pvc is colored. for that matter, you don't see any reaction products of copper if the sheathing is colored or opaque. being as its strictly a surface phenomena, its not a worry. i plan on carrying out some quasi studies of a relative nature and i'll post the results. i'm curious what effect various conditions have on the acceleration of this phenomena.
     

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