Help!! New JVC progressive PQ problem.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jon.Dickinson, Feb 17, 2003.

  1. Jon.Dickinson

    Jon.Dickinson Auditioning

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I just fired up my new JVC sa600 progressive this weekend and noticed something. I was watching “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” on a Panny PT-47wx. The PQ looked great through out the movie until the very end I noticed dark areas were flat and the detail was very poor. It was something I would of definitely noticed at the beginning of the movie. I would call myself a slightly above average Home Theater geek, but I’m lost for words to describe the situation. Basically what I saw was the detail of the actors hair become flat and the detail was gone, although the rest of the picture looked fine. I swapped software to compare and could not see the same flatten look, but I think paranoia was setting in and started to see a less detailed PQ then I expected. I then checked out “Ice Age” and the PQ again looked perfect, but the fur detail of the dark brown Mammoth looked a little flat (again I think paranoia skewed my perception). I’m going to run “Video Essentials” tonight to see if it clears up the problem, but I wanted to post this message to see if I might have a bad processor and if anyone else experienced this problem with their progressive scan player.

    Thanks!!

    jon
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It could simply be an issue related to DVD authoring, Jon. Many transfers can seem superbly detailed in some sections yet a little fuzzy in others. Or it could even be the film itself—in other words, a cinematography issue. In either case, there's nothing you can do about it.

    As you've already indicated, your own paranoia might be in play: You've just spent some money on a new toy and you're being hypercritical. Human nature, sir!
     
  3. Jon.Dickinson

    Jon.Dickinson Auditioning

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Your right Jack, I do realize some software looks better than others.

    What’s confusing me is the PQ of the movie looked fine at the beginning, then looked terrible at the end. I then went back and started to notice the flat detail of the hair at the beginning of the movie, something I would of picked up right off.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,756
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Since you noticed it at the early part of the film on a second look, it is most likely the disc or cinematography. Greek Wedding was a low budget movie to start with Ron did mention some pic issues in his review.

    BTW, if you go into the picture control menus on the JVC, you can adjust "gamma" under User 1 and User 2 to bring out shadow detail.
     
  5. Phil Nichols

    Phil Nichols Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2000
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jon,

    Getting dark areas to look just right is one of the most challenging areas for progressive DVD, IMHO. I have spent hours on this.

    It's not as simple as "just calibrating with AVIA" or some other cal disc. The interplay between the black level setting for your display, the lighter (7.5 IRE) and darker (0 IRE) settings of your DVD player and the gamma settings (if it has this) of your DVD player are very subtle and sensitive. I've had to go way beyond just using calibrated dark area settings from AVIA and fiddle extensively with all the adjustments I just mentioned. Don't be discouraged by what you saw in MBFGW, there most likely is a combination of global settings that will probably prove to be "just right" for dark area detail on DVD's with your particular HT setup. It may take some work, however.

    Right now I'm using the outstanding "lights off in the garage scene" near the beginning of Space Cowboys, along with AVIA, to get things just right. The garage scene is full of EXTREMELY dark area detail that takes place in the first 16 bits of DVD dark level encoding. Getting this scene's dark areas to pop out without "washing out" all the other blacks later in the film can be a daunting task. I'm close - a little more tweaking should do it (I hope). I know this scene is chuck full of finely delineated dark area detail because I can force the details with extreme gamma settings in the lowest 16 bits. However, if I use these extreme gamma settings as permanent global settings then details in dark hair, etc., are lost and look washed out elsewhere.

    Is your Panny PT-47wx display based on CRT technology or is it plasma or something else? I'm afraid it it's not a CRT based display, then there is only so far you can go with black area detail and compromise will be the name of the game for getting dark area detail to pop out.
     

Share This Page