Help me set the phase and PEQ on my PB1+

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Stephen Houdek, Apr 16, 2004.

  1. Stephen Houdek

    Stephen Houdek Second Unit

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    I received my new PB1+ yesterday. I installed and calibrated it with my Radio Shack SPL meter using Avia. It is installed in a closed corner behind a love seat. (Not sure if the love seat is affecting it or not.)

    The low stuff is great, however the mid bass region is extremely lacking. There is a significant SPL drop when using the AVIA frequency sweep in the 60-70hz region. This is my first sub and I don't consider myself a Boomy bass lover. Prior to this sub, my bass was provided by my JBL S312's set to large. (They are now set to small) I think it sounds marginally better with them set to large if this helps diagnose my issue(s).

    I've ensured everything is set up properly THREE times. Using Bitstream from my DVD player and all latenight and processing modes are off. The only thing I have enabled on my Onkyo TX-DS797 is RE-EQ and up sampling.

    I'm not sure if the problem is phase or if I need to mess with the PEQ. I'm also not sure how to get the test tones necesssary to do the PEQ accurately per the manual.

    I'm also not sure what I'm really listening for when setting the phase. It didn't seem to make a noticeable difference when I turned it. A more precise description of what I'm listening for when turning the phase knob would be helpful.

    Any help from those of you who are more experienced with this would be appreciated.
     
  2. Stephen Houdek

    Stephen Houdek Second Unit

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    BTT
     
  3. Robb Roy

    Robb Roy Supporting Actor

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    Stephen,

    The first thing you need to try is placement. Sometimes it doesn't take much movement of the sub or listening position to significantly alter the frequency response.

    Once you've got your best location, then you can mess with phase (of course, you may have no way to alter the location...). The advantage of continuously variable phase is that you can really dial in your sub. This is easiest by having one person slow adjusting the phase during a loop of bass intensive music while you listen. What you'll be looking for is the loudest and/or best sounding phase position to you.

    -Robb
     

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