Help? Is it possible to convert 14 audio guage wire into Component video?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Al Siu, Jun 9, 2003.

  1. Al Siu

    Al Siu Auditioning

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    Help for a newbie!

    Setup:
    I just moved into my new delevlopment and requested an S-video cable to be pre-installed from my closet to the TV.

    Problem:
    The subcontractor forgot to install the S-Video but instead installed three sets of 14 guage audio cables by accident. WTF. Well, now they are saying that they can convert the 14-guage cables into conponent video cables. They sodered the cables and it works for composite RCA slots but I tried in the component slots and there is no picture. The composite look grainny but I would never be able able to upgrade for HDTV or a better picture.

    Should I push and have them re-install and upgrade me to real componet video cables? (that would mean that they drill holes and fish the lines through...more damage to my house...)

    any advise? Is the subcontractor trying to get away with a make-shift substitute?

    thanks

    al
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    It's not good I'm afraid. For starters, if this is clear 14 gauge that's being run through the walls, your local building department and or Fire Marshall can advise you if it should've been plenum type material or otherwise. Just give them a simple phone call and they can advise you what is required according to code in your particular area.

    But moving along...no it can't be made into component video. For starters, if the insulation on the wires is PVC, then this is poor for video because PVC's dielectric strength is notoriously non-linear with frequency. I've never tried it, but maybe, just maybe, on something like a 1 foot cable this might work, but in your case, as the lengths of the cable become longer, it becomes increasingly more important to use a 75 ohm cable because the length of the cable is approaching 1/4 of the length of the signal length. Also, there's no friggin shielding, such as braid over foil on what they installed. If you want a more technical, with numbers explanation of that, just ask. Further, when running 3 video cables, as in component, matching the lengths is fairly, maybe very, important. What they should've run is one of those nice little Belden 3 wires in 1 flexible cables. Or if your overall length was fairly short, like 12 feet, and you didn't need special plenum rating, you could certainly get away with a 12' GE from Target for $20. Like this: http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html...sin=B000063SGW

    By all means have them replace it. It's their screw-up and they should absorb the cost but if they decide to make good, then likely you'll need to pay the difference in wire costs while they absorb the labor.

    Rather than trying to say he's screwing you, let's just call him an a$$hole shall we? I'd prefer that you contact the above mentioned authorities on what's allowed just so you don't get hosed by the guy.
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Al, I strongly suggest you be nice about it and have them run a set of Component cables as well. (The world is moving towards component connections anyway.)

    If you contact www.bluejeanscables.com, I believe they will sell you 2 runs of 3-conductor cable:

    - 1 set of component video cables (with the wonderful Canare coax & connectors).

    - 1 set of 3-conductor component video cables made with Belden RG59, but one wire with RCA plugs for Composite, and 2 of the wires soldered into SVideo plugs. You have to go with the RG59 because of the size. The RG6 just does not fit well.

    This will give you all 3 video connection types. You will never regret the extra capacity.

    Note: Svideo connectors are a pain to connect to wires. While you can do your own RCA plugs, SVideo takes some skill/experience to do correctly. There was a white-paper floating around a few years ago advising even DIY cable builders to not even bother with SVideo unless they were experienced electronic techs.

    Short Advice: No way in he-- should you let some fumble-fingered construction worker attach SVideo connectors even to true SVideo cable. Buy the cable with the connectors attached from a custom site and make the workers fish it through for you.
     
  4. Lee Carbray

    Lee Carbray Second Unit

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  5. Al Siu

    Al Siu Auditioning

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    Thanks so much for the feedback. I am meeting with the installer on Sat. and I will request that he upgrade me to the real component cables. I should probably purchase the cables myself and have him compensate me for his error and reintall the add'l cables. Knowing the installer and the tricks thus far, I'll end up with something worse it if leave it up to them.

    I appreciate the advise
     
  6. Al Siu

    Al Siu Auditioning

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    I have been talking with the installer and he is saying that the audio cables are shielded 14 guage wire and now that it should work. The new twist is that he is claiming that he can place an adapter for the 3 cables for a S-Video connection. It seems like he is trying to wiggle he way out of the situation.


    Add'l details:
    The current cable is 6 separate audio cables wrapped in a thin shield. What they did was solder 2 wires each to RCA connectors. Like I stated before it works for composite connection but we are unable to see a picture when connected to the component outlets.

    I have printout info off the bluejeans.com website to compare a real component cable versus the converted one I have.

    Is there any add'l information that I should state to the installer to prove that he should replace the cables? I am trying to get him to upgrade me to the Bluejeans components because it is rough what he was charging to the S-Video cable. Think I have a legit argument?
    A
     
  7. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    he's lying like a rug or is dumber than dogsh*t. it can't be done...always small claims court [​IMG]
     
  8. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Video cables need to be made from 75 ohm coax. This maintains a constant distance from the center wire to the outer shield, and matches the input impedence on your television. It should be round and as thick/thicker than your CATV coax.

    No way are speaker wires going to do this.

    It would have been better if they had just run RG6 CATV coax - at least this is 75 ohms.

    They dont know what they are doing! Get your money back and hire someone who does.
     

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