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Help!! I'm getting a new TV!!

Discussion in 'Displays' started by NickSI, Jan 26, 2005.

  1. NickSI

    NickSI Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi i am looking into getting a new TV. my current model is 13 years old and was a good tv in its day (PIP and the like)
    now i want a new one. my current set is a 27" and i don't want to go much bigger 30" or 32" max. what should i get? LCD, DLP, Flat Tube, Plasma? Space is no issue and if i were to get a flat pannel display it would not hang on a wall. I want HDTV and i don't think i need a built in Tuner as i would get the HD through my cable company. any suggestions? Brands Types keep my old one? any thing. oh Price range is ~2000 on the low side.
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    I will suggest, so you don't have a significant decrease in your 4:3 material size, that you not go smaller than a 32" widescreen.

    Have you at least glanced at any of the newer technologies (not CRT) at some stores? Any preferences at all??

    Lots of good HD LCD direct view displays in that price range.

    A few good Plasmas in that size too.

    Good ol CRT in that price range can give you a very nice Sony high end set, but man are they heavy in that size.

    Choosing an HDTV this day and age will pobably drive you bonkers. [​IMG] I know it did me.
     
  3. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    Buying a tv now is about compromises as every technology does some things better than others, but some things worse. Sounds like you already know you want HD which is good. Definitely want to go with a 16:9 widescreen set. Size isn't an issue - that is also good as the widescreen sets with side mounted speakers cause trouble for some armoires like mine. Maybe you could post some of your other wants or preferences? How much sunlight gets into the room? Do you worry about reflections on the screen? Do the tv's speakers make a difference or will you be using a HT system for sound? How far is the main seating area from the tv and is it fixed or can you move the seating to suit the screen? Do you have to worry about wide viewing angles for some of the seating? How important are black levels important (do you watch a lot of dark movies/tv)? Do you play video games or watch tv that has a lot of tickers, static logo's etc that could burn an image onto the screen? Better yet, divide up your tv use by percentage - dvd, sports, game playing, primetime tv, cable - e.g. I watch 40% dvd, 5% games, and 55% tv. Of the 55% tv, 95% is sports and primetime network shows which are in hidef. The remaining 5% is from non-network channels that are not in hidef. That'll help get you started on the way to narrowing it down.
     
  4. NickSI

    NickSI Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey guys thanks for the feed back. Charlie i have some answers for you. i do have glare problems as my family room (where the TV is) has lots of windows. i am getting a new TV stand so that is no problem. I have a brand new 5.1 JBL set that i love so i don't even need tv speakers. seating position is bad as the couch is centered around a fire place and the TV is on the side. so viewing angle is important. i do watch dark movies LOTR, Matrix and the like. TV 60% DVD 35%
    Video games 5%. not worried about burn in. most of TV is Primetime
     
  5. MarcVH

    MarcVH Second Unit

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    Well, let's see. 32" would be pretty small for a plasma (42" is more typical) and still out of your price range. So forget plasma. I've never seen a DLP TV smaller than 43", so that's out. That pretty much leaves you with LCD or tube, if you're set on the size contstraints you mention; I'd probably go for a tube TV in the current position, or an LCD TV if you could hang it above the fireplace and let it be in a better viewing position relative to the room's configuration.

    Just curious, where do the size limitations come from? With a 32" TV you'd have to be sitting somewhat close to it to really notice the improvement of HDTV; most people who want to go HDTV also want to be able to appreciate the picture improvement by getting the biggest screen size they can get away with.
     
  6. NickSI

    NickSI Stunt Coordinator

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    the problem is that when we watch tv we sit 7' away. with much larger you have to turn your head to watch TV. now if i am at a tennis match thats fine but for a movie it is no good. plus the lady of the house "will not have a monstosity in my living room". I have a glare problem as the sun rises right opposite my TV and you get glare until about 12:00 noon and this impeades on my sports watching on weekends. so which is better for glare reduction.
     
  7. NickSI

    NickSI Stunt Coordinator

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    Oh i was just looking at circuit city's web site just to see what's out there and i am seeing plasmas for under $2000 what is the danger of buying cheap flat panel TVs (LCD and PLasma)
     
  8. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    Nick -

    That's good that you have your own sound. Seems like the biggest considerations are glare and viewing angles. As you are not looking for a huge screen, you should likely be choosing between a flat plasma, lcd or else a good ol' 34" picture tube. Each of these technologies will be fine from all viewing angles. The picture tube ought to give you better blacks than the other two, but you'll have to compare the particular makes and models. The plasma and LCD will typically throw off more light and be better for dealing with the glare. They are typically not as good dealing with blacks, but the technology is always improving. Plasma is typically better with the blacks then LCD. Plasma does suffer from burn in, while LCD does not.

    The CRT will be big and heavy. The "Boss" might actually think that the 42" flat screen clashes less with the room decor than a 34" CRT. If you go with a flat panel LCD or plasma, can you get any additional space between the seating area and the tv (because of the lesser depth of the flat screen)? Or is going in a corner? If you can get a little further away you can go to a bigger screen, though 7' might be fine for a 42". 2 times the diagonal size of the screen is on the low end of acceptable viewing distance.

    Edit - When you go to look at tv's, make sure you are viewing them from the same distance that you will have at home. This is especially true because you will be close to the screen at home. You want to make sure that the picture quality holds up at short distances before you buy.
     
  9. MarcVH

    MarcVH Second Unit

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    That's an EDTV, not an HDTV. That might be OK for you, but you'd initially said you wanted an HDTV.

    I'd agree with Charlie's comments that you may find that flat screen options have less of an "monstrosity" impact on the room than a big heavy tube TV.
     
  10. Elinor

    Elinor Supporting Actor

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    Every plasma I've seen has a glass screen which means: GLARE. Not ideal in a bright room.

    Most LCDs have matte screens, good at diffusing glare. My RP-LCD is in a very bright room with windows opposite and to the left and does very well. Plenty bright for the room, rarely too much glare.

    I'd take a hard look at Sharp LCDs (direct view). If you're going to jump up to a large size (40" +) then Panasonic makes a good RP-LCD in that size.

    What is the fascination with hanging tv's over fireplaces? God, I'd never do that. 1. Heat rises, and heat is never good for any electronics. 2. I really don't want that "sitting in the front row at the movie theater" craning sensation. 3. It's just dumb.
     
  11. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    Elinor-

    You're right about the glass fronts on the plasmas, but they still work well in bright rooms because they throw off so much light. Nothing will look great with sunlight directly on the screen, but the plasmas I have seen are better than CRT tubes in bright rooms. He also has a viewing angle issue and 7' viewing distance which pretty much eliminated RP and larger screen sizes. I have nothing against RP. My own set up is in a basement room and is a Hitachi CRT RP. I recommend it whenever I can, but the reason it worked for me is I have no glare, viewing angle or seating distance issues, which are the weaknesses of my set. [​IMG]
     
  12. Elinor

    Elinor Supporting Actor

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    RP-CRT is surely the best value out there if you can deal with its issues, and they have beautiful pictures.

    The reason I think that there are so many competing and successful technologies is that we all have placement strengths and weaknesses, and different budgets. There is a perfect fit for just about everyone.

    Patience is the key, and spending lots of time in the stores viewing (and online gathering information).
     
  13. MarcVH

    MarcVH Second Unit

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    It probably stems from the fact that lots of rooms are arranged such that there is a "focal point" of the room which is a perfect place for a large TV, but some idiot has gone and put a fireplace there instead. [​IMG]

    If you sit in a recliner or the like when watching TV, then looking up slightly is pretty natural. If you sit on a conventional couch it may be less desirable.

    "Above the fireplace" is not perfect, but I still like it better than putting the TV in a corner where both the visual and acoustic properties get screwed up.
     
  14. NickSI

    NickSI Stunt Coordinator

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    does any body have any suggestions for places to shop. i live in a small town with only a best buy really not much else. any suggestions?
     

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