help fix my stupid mistake!(sonosub)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Seungsoo Hwang, Mar 20, 2001.

  1. Seungsoo Hwang

    Seungsoo Hwang Stunt Coordinator

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    Heh it seems I cut my endcaps for my sonosub a tab bit small, so they slip in and out easily. Is there any way to go about fixing this? Anyone else make such a mistake and got around it somehow? Or should I just nail it to the side and goop a bunch of silicone in the seams? ARG what a mistake, I could have easily avoided by checking the first circle to make sure, but no, I had to cut em all out, cut the driver and the port holes along with it. Any suggestions? *there is about a 1/8" gap at the widest..*
    thanks!
     
  2. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    hi
    you could try that polyurethane "gap filling as it cures" glue. it should bridge a 1/8" gap easily. whats it called? probond? ,titebond? arg i cant remember its name. its in the brown and white bottle. hth
    ------------------
    *why build one when you can build two for twice the price*
    jeff
     
  3. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Urethane glue is best for gluing wood to wood.
    For bonding nonsimiliar materials like wood to the plastic coated walls of sonotube use a siliconized acrylic caulk. This will adhere the materials, and fill the gap. Drive a few nails to hold the caps in place while the adhesive drys.
     
  4. Chris Hoppe

    Chris Hoppe Stunt Coordinator

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    You could iron on a strip of veneer all the way around it!
     
  5. Seungsoo Hwang

    Seungsoo Hwang Stunt Coordinator

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    thanks for the help guys. I think im going to see about putting some sort of material(veneer-ish) to fill some more area then use that caulk or glue.
    thanks again.
     
  6. Brett_A

    Brett_A Stunt Coordinator

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    One side of mine was a tad bit small and I coated the edge of the endcap with wood filler then when I put it in I loaded it up with glue. I topped it all off with liquid nails and then silicone caulking. No problems here.
    ------------------
    Brett
     
  7. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    i thought that poly stuff was good for anything. i learn something here everyday [​IMG]
    ------------------
    *why build one when you can build two for twice the price*
    jeff
     
  8. Eric S

    Eric S Agent

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    Wood filler did the trick for me. My carefully measured circles were apparently not measured carefully enough... I ended up with a gap of about 1/8" too. Lots of wood filler a little bit at a time into the cracks did the trick. Its important to go little by little because the filler shrinks and cracks as it dries. Follow up the whole mess on the inside with plenty of caulk and you'll be fine. Mine is rock solid despite the miscut.
     
  9. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Be careful using wood filler. Most of it tends to be ridged(brittle) when dry. That could lead to potential problems when the walls of the tube flex as they will do when the sub is moved.
     
  10. JerryD

    JerryD Extra

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    If you have some spare MDF and access to a good table saw, it is quite possible to cut a strip of MDF 1/16th inch by 3/4th inch and long enough to cover the circumference of the end cap. When cut this thin, the strip will be flexible enough to bend to the curve of the end cap. You could glue this on with TiteBond II or whatever your favorite woodworking glue. IMHO this will give you the most solid fix to fill the gap. It will also be the easiest way to make sure the cap is centered in the tube, so that the overhang of the outside cap is uniform. MDF is actually quite forgiving to work with because it doesn't have a directional grain and a joint with a good woodworking glue becomes at least as strong as the MDF itself. If anything is cut too short you can scab on a piece to fix it and really not loose anything but time.
     
  11. Trenton McNeil

    Trenton McNeil Second Unit

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    Go to auto parts store, get a roll of 1/8" weatherstripping. Apply, insert into sonotube, nail, caulk, finish, done.
     
  12. Seungsoo Hwang

    Seungsoo Hwang Stunt Coordinator

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    Is that weather stripping really that thick? that sounds like an easy alternative. I thought about wood filler and thought it would be too brittle as well, im surprised lots of ya have used it with success. Cutting a thin strip of MDF, sounds like the "best" method, albiet the most difficult. Thin MDF always kinda bent then broke in my experience, but the curvature of the 18" sonotube isnt that steep, so maybe I can get it to work.
    Thanks again for the suggestions, extremely helpful.
     
  13. John E Janowitz

    John E Janowitz Second Unit

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    ThomasW writes:
    "For bonding nonsimiliar materials like wood to the plastic coated walls of sonotube use a siliconized acrylic caulk"
    You're supposed to peel that plastic or wax coating out of there first. :) well, I guess you don't have to, but it makes gluing the endcaps in much easier. Also makes gluing in any kind of felt or polyfill on the inside of the tube easier. You can usually just start peeling at the end, and keep pulling. The coating should all come out in one big long peel.
    As far as fixing the small endcap goes, you can always cut 4 to 8 small shims to stick in there. Screw the endcap in through all of the shimms. Then take Bondo, or that Minwax wood filler which is pretty much the same thing, and fill the rest of the gap with it. Make sure to push enough into the gap so that it comes through to the inside. Leave a little extra and then sand it off. The bondo will stick to both the cardboard tube(peel the coating), and the MDF endcaps very well and make a good solid joint.
    John
     

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