Help! Cpu overheating.

Discussion in 'Computers' started by ChuckM, Mar 27, 2003.

  1. ChuckM

    ChuckM Stunt Coordinator

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    Well I got my cpu installed and 99.999999999% positive i did it right, but the pc health stats on bios says its overheating. I belive the problem is that the cpu socket is right under the power supply and then its blocked off by my video card and CD-Roms. I Just don't think it's getting enough air. I have the bios to give me a warning when it reaches 50C/122F and shut off when it reaches 60C. If anyone has any information please pass it on.
     
  2. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    Yep, that picture is terrible! What I did with mine was to mount an extra fan inside the case. On most of the motherboards, the CPU would be mounted so that it would sort of be on the bottom half of the chassis. I got some small angle brackets and drilled 2 small holes through the case and now it is just a few inches from the CPU, and gives the incoming air an extra boost before it goes out the back.

    I know this sounds dumb but make sure that the CPU fan is going as fast as it should, and that nothing else is blocking the air flow that is there now.

    Glenn
     
  3. Camp

    Camp Cinematographer

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    What kind of CPU is it?
    50 C is a little high but well within the operating temps of most common CPUs http://www.heatsink-guide.com/maxtemp.htm

    What heatsink/fan combo are you using?

    Will it boot to Windows? -Is it stable?
    Can you measure the temp within Windows?
     
  4. ChuckM

    ChuckM Stunt Coordinator

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    IT's an AMD XP 1800+ using the fan and heatsink that comes in the package.

    Yes the fan is pluged in[​IMG]
     
  5. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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    Thermal grease layer too thick?
     
  6. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    well, athlon XPs have an operating range up to 80dC before thermal problems occur, and wether or not you believe it 50dC is quite common for the oem heatsink and fan combo. . . that is why most of us by aftermarket cooling. Athlons do run hotter than p4's but it's nothing to sweat about.

    doesn't sound like you have any problems at all.
     
  7. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    It sounds like you're using quite a small case. Ideally the case should have a fair amount of space inside that isn't cluttered by components and cabling - and also has an inward and exhaust fan to maintain air throughput.

    But as (the other) Rob said, 50c is very common with Athlon processors.

    How much of a difference do you get between idle and 100% CPU usage temperatures?
     
  8. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    Just wondering but is thermal grease mandatory? Intel doesn't include any in the retail boxes. I never used it for my p2.4b, have no case fans and I never overheated (but I could always run cooler).
     
  9. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  10. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    Ahhh you are correct. There was a small black pad on the botom of the HSF. Didn't know it was a form of grease. [​IMG]
     
  11. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    some form of thermal interface is a MUST. if you don't use anything to fill in the minor imperfections on the cpu core then hot air pockets will form in them and could potentially cause damage to the processor. Most manufacturers do just put a TIM (thermal interface material) on the bottom of the heatsink to make it easier for the consumer to install it. but use of a better material like Arctic silver is reccomended.
     
  12. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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    What kind of motherboard is it? Some motherboards have built in CPU OverHeat protection built in that will automatically shut down the CPU to protect it. This feature can be toggled with on most motheboards that have this so that you can increase the temperature at which it shuts down. My XP2200+ (Sold for a 2.53ghz Intel) would run at around 40-50c while my Intel runs at a cool 25-30 in comparison. Your best bet besides making sure that you used the right amount of thermal grease would be to look into another case that is a Mid-ATX and would only run you around $30-50.

    KyleS
     
  13. Eric Alderson

    Eric Alderson Stunt Coordinator

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    My athlon xp 1800 has hit 70 degrees on full load and it seems to work just fine while my motherboard/case temp has never passes 32 degrees.
     
  14. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    The last time I checked, the overheat protection on a motherboard is not nearly fast enough to save an AMD chip if there is a catestrophic HSF failure, i.e. if it comes completely off the chip. If this happens while you're playing some 3D first person shooter game, the CPU will crash in less than half a second, and the magic smoke will be released. The motherboard will probably be damaged by the heat also. But I suppose motherboard protection will protect against a gradual failure such as a fan wearing out.

    Intel P4 chips have their own built-in thermal protection. If one gets too hot, it automatically slows itself down to the point that it's no longer hot. P3 chips also had thermal protection, but they saved themselves by shutting down.
     
  15. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    I had a Duron to go the great computer store in the sky last month. It was my own fault for not fitting the HSF properly. I heard a 'clunk' inside the machine, followed by immediate shutdown. Sure enough the heatsink had fell off the CPU and the chip had died instantly.
     

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