height or riser

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andrew Pratt, Jan 17, 2002.

  1. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    When you add in a second row of seating how high is the riser usually?
     
  2. Leo

    Leo Second Unit

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    About 6 inches is what I've been told. I'm building one for the back row of seats in my home theater. It should be sufficient height to see a 65 in RPTV HDTV.
     
  3. RogerB

    RogerB Second Unit

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    Mine is about 10". It is a pretty big step but provides an unobstructed view.
     
  4. Andrew Raubuck

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    I have heard that you should measure from your sholders to the top of your head. Since you would need that height to see over the person in front of you. I would guess that would be between 6-10" or so. I would use a 2x6 with two sheets of 3/4" plywood and carpet. That should work.

    I cant wait to get started on my HT room.

    Andy
     
  5. George Martin

    George Martin Stunt Coordinator

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    I built mine 8" tall and it has worked out perfectly for my set up. I still need to find a way to make it easier to move though as it blocks the door to my under house storage.

    Thats a project for later this winter.
     
  6. rodney wiley

    rodney wiley Second Unit

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    My riser is 10 inches and its great. Im gonna build a "stage" for my rptv about 8 inches high. I think then even I (6'5") could sit if front and they could still see well in the back.
     
  7. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    I went with a ~5" high riser which fits my needs perfectly. One consideration in my case was a 7'6" high ceiling which limited the height of the riser a bit so that there would be adequate clearance for everything else and no chance of heads hitting the FP overhead. As you probably know, you can see all of this in my HT web site pictures.

    Lots of good advice here regarding measurements, etc. Remember, this is an individual thing and dependent to some extent on your HT environment.
     
  8. Duane_T

    Duane_T Stunt Coordinator

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    My riser is about 9" - works well for me. If you can, find something to temporarily put under your couch/chairs/loveseat in the back and test it out with someone in the front row. That should give you an idea of what height you will need. I think I used a bunch of old catalogs and phone books under the legs of my couch to test mine out before I built it.
     
  9. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    I built mine with 2x6's and a sheet of 3/4" plywood. I like it a lot, but if I made another I would use 2x8's. I find myself slouching back in the couch so much it almost defeats the purpose!

    Good luck!

    Ace
     
  10. Kurt B

    Kurt B Stunt Coordinator

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    Good info. Has anyone made a 'portable' riser? I can see having to move it some if the TV is changed in size, etc. I've thought of laying carpeting on the floor as normal, then carpeting the riser the same but not mounting it permanent to the floor to allow it to move as needed.

    If anyone has done this, do you find it stable?

    ~Kurt
     
  11. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    That's exactly what I did. That thing is heavier than all get out! (Especially with the sofa on it) It's not moving unless 2 grown men try to move it! "It's stable enough for you, old man. What's the cargo?"
     
  12. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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  13. Kurt B

    Kurt B Stunt Coordinator

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    Excellent. Great news on the portable riser. Those that did this, did you construct it out of 2x6 or 2x8? Did you do them 16" on center?
     
  14. Grady Hollums

    Grady Hollums Second Unit

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    I wish I could make a riser that would only be about 2" off the ground that could be raised the adition 5" with some small lever or something. The reason is becaue it is in my living room and if we use it for just talking then my guests would be looking down at everyone else.

    In my dream dedicated HT I would have the top two risers built into the floor and with hydro lifts rise up when the THX intor plays, heh. That would be so much fun!
     
  15. MarkMaestas

    MarkMaestas Agent

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    The riser height can vary significantly depending on your theater environment. Some issues to look at:

    Your TV/Screen- What is the height? If you have a TV and the screen is closer to the ground, the higher your back seats will need to be to get a good view. If your screen is higher up on the wall, the people in the back will be looking up and will not need as high of a riser.

    Your ceiling Height- Some basement or attics have lower ceilings. If you have a low ceiling, be careful that tall people won't hit their head on the ceiling, soffits, etc. Also, if you have a ceiling mounted projector, make sure that the seats aren't high enough that it becomes a viewing problem.

    The Seats themselves- If you can stagger the seating so that the people in the back row are looking between the heads of the people in the front row, then your riser height can be smaller. If the people are seated directly in back of the people in the front, then they need enough clearance to see completely over them. If you have recliners or couches that you sink into or may want to slouch in, then you will need a higher riser.

    General construction indicates that steps that are about 7" are the most comfortable for most people. People tend to trip over steps that are smaller...they don't see them...and people don'r expect to drop as far as they do with steps that are higher. I don't think 8" is a big deal, but if you get as high as 12", you may want to make a step up to the raised platform.

    Take a serious look at all of these things before you decide. I have a friend who has a home theatre with recliners in the front and a couch on the riser in the back row. when the kids watch a movie, since they are smaller, they can't see over the chairs, even with the riser. So, either the kids sit on the floor or he ends up on the couch and the kids get the recliners. Not exactly what he intended. So, we will probably rebuild a 14" platform with a seperate single step up to the platform so he can have his chair back.

    Good Luck

    Mark
     
  16. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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  17. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    Mark,

    Very informative post! People who are building or contemplating building a riser should heed this advice.

    My riser is about 5" high which is perfect for my needs because the back row seating is staggered in relation to the front row of recliners. In fact, the two outer theater seats in the back row (see my HT pix for clarification) are probably the best seats in the house because the line of sight to the screen is over the side tables in the front row and the seats are a little further back (about 14 feet) from the screen. Of course, I still prefer the comfort of the recliners, but everyone who sits in any one of the seven permanent chairs has a great view. (Any additional people get to sit in directors' chairs around the periphery which also works because there is no light dropoff on the sides with my screen/projector combination.)

    One very good point made about low risers (like my 5" riser) is the possibility of tripping on it because it is so low. While this is not a major problem I will eventually address this with some rope lighting to emphasize the existence of a small step - especially when a movie is showing.
     

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