Heating my new theater in the basement?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Billy Gun, Nov 25, 2001.

  1. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What are some good methods of heating my new theater that I'm costructing in my new home?

    It is in the basement, and the upstairs has a natural gas forced hot air system.

    I don't want a "Cold" home theater.

    Suggestions????
     
  2. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1997
    Messages:
    1,190
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Utah USA
    Real Name:
    Wes Peterson
    Its stiil early into the winter here, but so far I am stuggling more on cooling the theater. Once you get amps projector and some 97deg heaters in there I have to kick on the cooling fans. I did install forced heating from off the main funace but so far the vent has been closed.

    Wes
     
  3. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Really?

    What part of the country are you in?

    I'm in PA, where the winter's can be very cold.....

    I'm worried the heat will rise to the ceiling and the seating areas will be cold.

    Are your vents at the ceiling level or near the floor?
     
  4. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1997
    Messages:
    1,190
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Utah USA
    Real Name:
    Wes Peterson
    I live in Salt Lake, like today for instance it was in the 30s and I went down to my basement dedicated theater 12x24x8 in size (fully under ground) and watched POTA by myself. The room was actually just right temp wise. My vent is in the ceiling and like I said was competly closed. But this week has been the first real cold week this winter so things might change temp wise in the room. But my room is very well insulated so I dont expect a big difference when we drop below 10deg out side.

    Wes
     
  5. NathanP

    NathanP Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2001
    Messages:
    841
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    But Wes,

    I've been to Utah many times before..

    Am I right in saying that you're so high up in altitude that because the air is so dry, 30 degrees feels more like 50?

    Nathan
     
  6. Dave Bertrand

    Dave Bertrand Auditioning

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2001
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I live in Denver, so I can speak for Utah's climate also. Yep, the air is bone dry, which makes both hot and cold more temperate.

    I'm planning to use electric baseboard heaters in my theater which is under construction. It's easier and more efficient than forced-air, and a lot quieter. Plus, if you use branch ducts from your existing system, it will require an additional thermostat and a zoned system to independently heat/cool the basement from the upper floors. Baseboard heaters, on the other hand, can be purchased with their own built-in thermostats and temperature controls.

    However, with baseboard heat you also need air circulation. I'm handling that by using a single duct, with openings at the front and back of the room. In the middle of the duct will be a 6" duct fan to move the air. Since the duct is not part of the existing HVAC system, no HVAC noise will be present in the room (assuming the duct fan is very quet, as I have been told).

    The basement is nice and cool in the summer, so cooling should not be an issue for me.
     
  7. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2000
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The thing you have to remember about a finished basement is that the temperature is going to stay pretty much constant year round.

    Granted, living in Georgia, the winters don't get all that cold, but we do usually have a few weeks of 30 and 40 degree temps and with the high humidity, makes it seem much colder than that.

    I normally keep my heat off during the day since nobody is home, and during the coldest time of the year, the basement is the place to be until the upstairs warms up. It can be 50 somthing degrees upstairs, but the basement is it's normal 65 or so degrees.

    I've got 3 vents down there, and I have one of them opened about 1/4 of the way. Anything more will about burn me out of there.
     
  8. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    For the guys that are using forced hot air ducts.......

    How do you isolate noise from going out/coming in through the ducts?

    Please advise.......
     
  9. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1997
    Messages:
    1,190
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Utah USA
    Real Name:
    Wes Peterson
     
  10. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2000
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  11. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    OK Thanks guys.
     
  12. Scott Page

    Scott Page Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2001
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    When I finished my basement and theater, I ran ducts off of the upstairs lines; two outlets on the ceiling in the HT. So far it is a little bit cool down there, just right for a cozy blanket while watching a movie, but not cold at all.

    I also ran a natural gas line to the HT area, which is capped for now. This is so that I could install a radient gas heater in the future if I needed more heat than the ceiling outlets provide. Radient gas heaters force the gas across ceramic plates with tiny holes producing a flame across their whole surface. They are VERY efficent, very quiet if you don't run the fan that some have. But they do produce some light (not much though). They don't need a vent either. They just mount on the wall and can put out a lot of heat.
     
  13. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Scott,

    I ran the same type of heater in my current basement (Non-vented except it ran on propane insread of gas.)

    and did it ever stink!

    I had to remove it.

    My wife and I couldn't take the gas fumes.

    Do the natural gas heaters have a smell?

    I know it's hard to smell them in a big show room, but I think they all have an odor that is noticible once you get them in a "Sealed room".

    Your thoughts....?
     
  14. Scott Page

    Scott Page Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2001
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I had a natural gas one in my previous basement. It was very effective in heating the whole basement. The room it was in was very small and no odors noticed at all. Propane does not burn as cleanly as natural gas. I think your wife would be fine with a natural gas one.
     
  15. KrisM

    KrisM Second Unit

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2001
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Billy, what type of heater did you use that was non-vented? The products of combustion have to go somewhere and if they are not vented outside, there will be odours.
     
  16. Scott Page

    Scott Page Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2001
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Kris may be correct about propane, I don't really know. But the type of heater I'm talking about in non-vented. It burns so efficiently that the combustion products are pretty benign.

    I guess I should not have said that there are no odors at all. But the odors are not very noticable. However, you and yours maybe more sensitive to that sort of thing.
     
  17. KrisM

    KrisM Second Unit

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2001
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would advise you to talk to a heating dealer of some sort. There are many different options for heating small spaces. If you are sensitive to the smell there are heaters that mount to a wall, take up very little space and can be vented right out the wall. Like I said in my last post, a fireplace would be a good option as well. The only problem with a fireplace is that most people want them to be the focal point of the room, and that just does not work in a home theater room, where the TV has to be the focal point(for obvious reasons).

    Good luck

    KrisM
     
  18. Darrin_R

    Darrin_R Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2001
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It is also very important to put in a cold air return if you connect into your existing heating system. The condensation that concrete produces is why some basements have that mildew smell. A cold air return removes the old air which greatly reduces of even prevents a mildew smell. The air in the room will not be stiff or stale as mentioned in one of the previous post.
     
  19. RossB

    RossB Extra

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2001
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    In my basement I have in slab hot water heating (in concrete). Is it cold here..well parts of Alberta have perma-frost...and the lakes freeze thick enough to drive semi's on...so we understand cold. With the slab heating it is easily the most comforable room in the house. I set the temperature at 70 degrees and it stays there. I highly recommend it. It is quite hard to retro slab heating but I have seen a product that you put over concrete..sort of a heated mesh, and then you can add tile, hard wood, or carpet. If you can afford an inch or two you can also add radiant heating a few different ways. I have had several houses and this is easily the best way to heat the room.
     
  20. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    OK cold air return for keeping dampness out during winter/colder times.

    What about dampness in the summer? Should I use a

    de-humidifier? And if so, are there quiet ones that are better for home theater applications?

    Comments........?
     

Share This Page