Heathers defective?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Raymond Johnson, Feb 9, 2002.

  1. Raymond Johnson

    Raymond Johnson Stunt Coordinator

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    I was about to watch the movie for the first time(since i bought the dvd) & it won't play at all!
    The strangest part was i did watch the documentary when i bought it and it played fine,but now..i can't get anywhere...it just keeps spinning in the tray.
    Has anyone else had trouble with the disc?
    Well i guess my plans for a high school hell double feature(Carrie SE,being the other) is ruined for now.
     
  2. Brian Lawrence

    Brian Lawrence Producer

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    I got rid of my copy shortly after I got it (The older version had better picture quality).

    Being that Anchor Bay seem to have these problems more than any other studio, I would just assume that it is a defective disc.
     
  3. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    Yes, this is a defective disc. It was reissued (apparently) with a v2 on the back cover, though I haven't seen any of these in this area. Either take it back to the store where you got it, or use Anchor Bay's mail in replacement procedure. It may take a while from past experience with them, but they will send a replacement.
     
  4. Alister Willis

    Alister Willis Auditioning

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    Hi,

    I've been meaning to ask as I'm having exactly the same problem with my Heathers disk. Watched the documentary fine when the disk arrived then put it on the shelf. Fancied watching the film about a week ago, put the disk in, try to play the film and it starts pixellating and skipping just after the intro about 5 minutes in...

    Tried it in another player and the player just displayed: "Bad Disk".

    Looks like I'll have to send it back to Anchor Bay.

    Cheers for the info,

    Woody.
     
  5. Richard Smith

    Richard Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    There is a v2 version of Heathers. It's the one I received. It's got a sticker on the back like Opera saying 'version 2.0'. Anchor Bay should just replace the faulty disc for you. Heres a link to the product return page for Heathers on the Anchor Bay website:
    Replacement Form
    Richard
     
  6. JackJD

    JackJD Stunt Coordinator

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    Did the defective disc issue involve the limited edition tin as well? I have two unopened tins, and until now I was totally unaware of the problem. Is it another disk that won't play on certain players (usually toshiba and sony), or is the problem universal? Thanks... -JD
     
  7. Noel

    Noel Extra

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    My orignal Heathers disc had severe problems on both my Toshiba 3109 & my PC DVD-ROM as mentioned on the forum when released.I found Version 2 (little sticker on back)at Best Buy recently it plays fine.
     
  8. PhilipG

    PhilipG Cinematographer

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    JackJD,
    Unfortunately the problem is universal, both tin and non-tin. [​IMG] It's DVD-Rot, and therefore non-player specific. I suggest you get Anchor Bay to replace your copies with v2. If your current discs haven't rotted yet, they will.
     
  9. AdrianJ

    AdrianJ Supporting Actor

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    Why isn't this listed on the Anchor Bay website like the recall for Opera was?
     
  10. Joseph J.D

    Joseph J.D Cinematographer

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    I have the original Heathers tin. I didn't have any problems with it on my Sony; However, all this talk of a defective first pressing warrants my taking another look at this disc- I've also printed out the form...just in case.[​IMG]
     
  11. MaxY

    MaxY Guest

    Yeah I got the tin, and it played fine on my Sony 9000, but I am worried as well that it might not next time.

    Max
     
  12. David Echo

    David Echo Stunt Coordinator

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    Does anyone have any information on whether Anchor Bay's replacement policy extends to shipping to Canada or is there a seperate way to handle Canadian customers? When I swapped my James Bonds discs up here to MGM, it was handled differently from the US procedure. Any info would be most appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Dave
     
  13. JohnS

    JohnS Producer

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    DAMN! I just checked this DVD, after reading this. The DAMN DVD won't play-UGH!
     
  14. Mark Zimmer

    Mark Zimmer Producer

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  15. Michael St. Clair

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  16. Jeff Krispow

    Jeff Krispow Stunt Coordinator

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    After reading this latest thread about defective Heathers discs, I once again decided to see what's up with my copy.
    I went ahead and watched my disc yesterday (the tin version), and it plays perfectly fine on my Pioneer 606-D -- it did not exhibit any problems with playback, audio, pixelation, anything.
    But Mark is absolutly correct in stating that Heathers' problems are due to a defective pressing, not this imaginary DVD rot. Any time something is wrong with a DVD, many people erroneously jump to the conclusion that they've been hit by the mysterious "DVD rot" -- because of some repeatedly bogus statements they've read on the net, they don't than understanding that their disc simply was the result of a manufacturing / pressing defect.
    Anchor Bay began using a new pressing facility, and unfortunately they had problems with them. Many discs were coming off the line defective, and most of them were not being rejected during the Q.C. phase. The same thing happened with Opera in a big way, and on some other titles in a smaller way. Companies are sent check discs to examine prior to a full pressing run, and if something is wrong, they can reject those discs. Those check discs worked fine, therefore the title was pressed, packaged, sealed, and sent out. There was no reason for them to suspect any problems until the reports started coming in from consumers.Thankfully Anchor Bay saw what was going on -- the discs were repressed properly and replacement were made available. Usually the pressing facility is the one who loses out monetarily, because they have to pay for the repressing, not the studio.
    The same happened a while ago with AnimEigo and a few of their Urusei Yatsura discs... nearly everything coming off the line was defective (they all featured the "water drop" effect) but didn't get rejected. Check discs were fine, but the pressed discs weren't. The defective ones were repressed and I was immediately sent replacements that were perfect. For another title (either another Yatsura disc or maybe it was Macross, the entire run of one disc was pressed, and AnimEigo examined them and found them all to be defective, and the discs were repressed properly -- thankfully all before the title was released. (Hmmm... I wonder if they both are using this same facility.)
    And thus I begin a short lecture on this supposed "DVD rot" nonsense...
    On the surface, DVDs and laserdiscs appear to be closely related to one another. But they are in truth two entire different beasts. The only thing they share in common with each other is that both are round and contain movies. DVDs and LDs are two completely different formats in nearly every respect, and that certain includes the manufacturing process. DVDs are not made nor manufactured the same way that laserdiscs were. The materials are different, the bonding process is different, everything is different -- and what everyone perceives as DVD rot is nothing more than a manufacturing defect.
    I have yet to see a DVD that actually rotted . Any photos I've seen on the web showing "proof of actual rot" have been nothing more than photos of known manufacturing defects -- such as pits and crater, or what is more commonly known as a "water droplet" effect -- these are defects that should have been discarded during the quality control (QC) phase, but it's not a 100% perfect process and bad copies do get through. Sometimes the "water drop" effect is so light, you can't even make it out unless you closely examine it under a very bright light source. I've had maybe 5 or 6 discs exhibit this defect, and they would usually play fine at first, and then get weirder over time. You will definitely have problems with this type of disc defect, and it's very likely that you'll encounter different playback problems each time you time and play it. A simple replacement for a new copy has always taken care of this problem...
    Then there are those claims of "rot" when the disc has surface miscolorations, especially on RSDL discs, where there are light swirling patterns or "coffee rings" -- these are neither rot nor a manufacturing defect. It's simply a by-product of the pressing phase. Sometimes the plastics used just have a slight coloration change the occurs while it is being formed. It occurs quite often and is not considered to be either a defect or a problem by the industry. And it's not... it doesn't affect the data layer in the slightest, nor the laser. Some DVDs are all silver, some are all gold, and some are all gold with slight coloration differences -- so what, the color doesn't matter, what's on the actual data layer does. I have a bunch of discs with this discoloration, and I've never had it cause any playback problems... (except in a very few instances where the disc itself had a real manufacturing defect, and the discoloration being there was just a pure coincidence.)
    The last problem that people confuse as "rot" has to do with the actual authoring of a disc. During the authoring stage, the disc coding , linkages, menus, etc. are iterally being put together. Authoring systems can be vastly different, as are DVD players, and problems can arise because of this. Early machines (notably Toshiba models -- I used to have one) are notorious for not being able to play "the latest discs" because of the way Toshiba programs their roms. Authoring problems can cause a disc to refuse to play -- or cause it to play back wonky or differently every time you try to watch it. Plus, depending upon the individual player model, there may be no problems or those problems can be worsened. But this isn't rot, nor a manufacturing defect... it's a programming defect.
    All DVD player manufacturers program their roms differently, and the roms often even change within the same player model during its manufacturing life. While there is a "DVD spec," some manufacturers follow it better than others. Some follow the specs to the bit, others take some liberties, therefore some players like some discs better than others. Error correction can also widely vary from player to player, and some play "off spec" discs better than others. This being as it is, it is literally impossible for studios to test out every single disc with every single player ever made -- if they had to do so, we'd never see any discs get released, because they would be testing them forever. But the discs ARE checked on players from various manufacturers that are representative of most of their models. But inevitably, a disc will have some problem on some player somewhere, just because of all the differences out there.
    I have 2,300+ DVDs, and everytime there is a supposed "rot" scare, I actually do take the time to check my discs to see if there was any truth to it. And I am happy to say that every single one of these supposedly "rotted" discs played perfectly -- including my first-pressing copies of Cabaret and Contact, wher some people have insisted that "rot" has destroyed every single copy ever pressed. Yeah, right.
    So just know that the disc you think has "rotted" is nothing more than a simple manufacturing defect -- nd you unfortunately got a disc that snuck past the "reject" process. A simple exchange should fix the problem. As for getting stuck with an authoring problem, well, there's not much that can be done about that -- it's almost always a compatibility problem with your player (like how The Phantom Menace was toasted on Malata models because of the roms, and had a few different problems on other players as well (none on my Pioneer, though). Unfortunately, unless you can get your roms upgraded, there's nothing that can be done about that (but discs with severe authoring problems ARE genernally caught before release, or are recalled and fixed).
    Well, I didn't really intend to give a lecture on real defects vs. phony rot, but they you go. I just hope that the information proves useful for some of you folks, and helps you understand the true nature of any DVD playback problems you might be having.
    Regards,
    Jeff
     
  17. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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  18. Michael St. Clair

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    Actually, laser rot is a pressing defect as well. The defect is using out-of-spec glue.
    I have a handful of Discovision discs that have not rotted and were stored in humid locations. If all laserdiscs 'rotted', they certainly would have. Likewise, I have a first pressing of 'Beauty and the Beast: Work in Progress' that has not rotted, though some say they all did. How is this different from DVDs of 'Contact' or 'From the Earth to the Moon'?
    I don't think the fact that DVD rot only affects certain percentages of certain pressings of certain titles does not prevent it from being 'rot', as Jeff says. 'Rot' does not imply that all of a given pressing of a given title will rot. Just as the term was used for laserdisc, it means that sometimes (very, very rarely) some discs are made out-of-spec in such a manner that they work initially, and fail later.
     
  19. Yumbo

    Yumbo Cinematographer

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    Mine looks like a blue CD-R!

    Doesn't play, being replaced.
     
  20. PhilipG

    PhilipG Cinematographer

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    My Heathers disc played just fine for a long while. Recently though I found it had stopped playing, on any player.
    No matter the cause, the fact remains it is DVD rot. You may want to call it something else, but if a disc plays fine once, is stored and treated correctly, and then fails, then in my book it has rotted.
    Same thing happened with my Frankenstein Created Woman DVD. [​IMG]
     

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