Hdtv

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by John Dickerson, Jan 30, 2004.

  1. John Dickerson

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    I'm interested in upgrading to HDTV since more and more networks are starting to offer a lot more programming. I recently bought a new Phillips TV that is not HD. Is it possible to get HD on my tv using some kind of convertor? What exactly do I need to go to HD and how much should i expect to spend?
     
  2. Jeremy Porter

    Jeremy Porter Auditioning

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    I'm sorry to tell you, but if your tv is not HD you are not going to benefit from HDTV. If your Phillips tv is an EDTV (enhanced definition tv) it will have component video inputs which means you can still receive HDTV signals but they will not be displayed at full resolution. Your only way to upgrade is to buy a true HDTV.
     
  3. John Dickerson

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    My TV does have component inputs. Do I have to buy a converrtor box to revieve HD or just a special antennae?
     
  4. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Now, in theory there are (or will be) boxes that will DOWNCONVERT HD signal to standard def signals so you can still display it on old TVs. However, the point of these converters is to keep older TVs compatible when the (theoretic) END of standard broadcasting comes in a few years. The idea is that there will be no more standard definition analog broadcasting, and a converter would be needed to get any signal at all--- but this is not needed just yet.

    For the time being, there would be NO reason to use such a box because the standard broadcasts stil exists... using such a box now- you will be taking a HD feed and simply converting it to standard definition, resulting in the same signal you get from cable or using a standard antenna receiving analog broadcasts. You're taking the HIGH out of HighDef, resulting in a standard signal because your TV cannot show HD.

    In order to display HD signals your set must have a very specific type of technology inside- the ability to resolve very high scan rates, which standard tv sets cannot do- outboard HD tuner or not. Even if you get a HD receiver, just connecting it to component inputs will not result in a HD image for you... you will actually just get garbage if your set is not HD capable, and might even damage it.

    Its not just a matter of just a tuner standing between you and HDTV, but rather the fact that your set does not have the capability to scan fast enough to resolve a HD picture. A "converter" would be a waste of time, the signal you're getting from cable or whatever is the same thing...

    -Vince
     
  5. John S

    John S Producer

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    John Dickerson:

    Does your new TV say it will receieve 480p from a DVD player?

    The sets that do that do ok on HDTV content, even though it is not displaying it in HDTV.

    What model is the Philips? Hard to imagine a new set NOT being HDTV ready these days, but they are out there still I know it.
     
  6. DianaK

    DianaK Auditioning

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    There are two things you could be talking about:

    1) A box that downconverts HD to something your non-HD TV can accept. I can't think of any HD-only source you'd be receiving, so this seems really useless.
    2) A box that receives and outputs HD and non-HD signals - like, for example an over-the-air (OTA) HD tuner that also outputs a down-converted signal (most of them do).

    There are two possible (although small) advantages to #2, if that's what you're talking about. One is digital reception. Just out of curiosity, I tested my HDTV tuner on a non-HD TV, and the picture was improved because I got rid of artifacts that were from not-great reception. The other advantage is just being future proof for when you eventually get HDTV. Still, it seems like a waste of money since you won't be benefiting from the HD-ness, and you can always just get it later for cheaper anyway.
     
  7. Dan

    Dan Stunt Coordinator

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    True that if you don't have an HDTV, you won't get the real HD signal. However, I had HD stations running to a non HDTV for a week before I got my HDTV, and the picture was incredibly better and noticeably different than the non. The channels looked DVD quality.

    In my experience, you CAN tell a difference even on a regular TV. But of course, it's much better on an HD set.
     

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