HDTV signal strength

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Cameron Yee, Jul 17, 2003.

  1. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    Cameron Yee
    I found specs on my local stations broadcasting in HD and was wondering what constitutes a full power signal. The most stable and best looking is my local CBS affiliate and according to the information I found is sending at 1000 kW. The ABC affiliate is only at 30 kW, which is consistent with it breaking up and dropping out whenever the local bus goes by (I use rabbit ears). If I rememember correctly, places like Philadelphia have some stations at 3000 kW.
     
  2. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    I find that ota digital reception quality is not as dependent on signal strength as it is on good unobstructed line of sight to the transmitter and lack of multipath or reflected signals off nearby objects. It also helps if the station isn't doing multicasting.

    I've seen rock-solid HD pictures with an indicated signal strength on my boxe's meter of only 44, and constant pixelation and freezeups with a reading of 100+.

    My local ABC station's HD feed is only watchable when they turn off thier 2 multicast subchannels.
     
  3. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    Whether the payload is HDTV or multicasting, payload has nothing to do with the ability to receive the signal. Multicasting will affect picture quality, but that's not the same as reception quality.
     

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