HDTV Antenna Coax cable and grounding wire questions.

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Grady Hollums, Oct 27, 2003.

  1. Grady Hollums

    Grady Hollums Second Unit

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    I just installed my antenna today (I hope it is going to work)But it turns out that I did not buy enough coax cable.Is it fine for me to get an extender and just add another 25-50 ft or should I return the cable and get one cable that is 100'?

    The guy at RadioShack told me that it would hurt the signal if I bought an extender and added another 25-50ft.

    So...Should I return the 50' coax cable and buy a 100' or just buy a connector and get another 25'-50' of coax?

    Also the grounding wire was not long enough either (only 40ft.) WOuld be be OK for me to buy more grounding wire and just twist it together with the other wire to extend the length?

    Thanks for all the help! I can't wait for my HDTV receiver/decoder to come in and I just immediately hook it up to my antenna. Thank you for any and all help!
     
  2. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    I'll probably get flamed for this by the purists, but in your situation, I'd go the easy route and add a piece of cable. The inline F-connectors are really not that bad; you might lose 1 dB at most. With OTA HD-digital signal, you either get it or you don't; the only reason to mess with it is if there are channels you would like to receive but can't because they are a smidge low on signal strength. In that case, you might want to swap out the cable with one continuous, high-quality, RG6.

    With regard to the antenna ground wire, this could be a lightning safety issue so I'd make sure any connections are high-integrity. I assume this is outdoors, so simply twisting bare copper wires isn't good enough (in my opinion and according to the NEC). At the least, twist and use a good wire nut with anti-corrosion / waterproofing goop. Wire nuts outside of an approved enclosure (electrical box) is probably also against NEC for power circuits, but I'm not sure about antennas. My only concern would be long-term sunlight deterioration of the wire nut. Incidentally, make sure the wire is clamped/supported so that there is no inadvertent tension on the connection.

    If it were me, I'd join the ground wires with an uninsulated inline crimp connector...then just solder it up at both ends. But this is just because I have connectors, crimpers, and soldering equipment at my fingertips. Otherwise, your local Home Depot probably has screw-clamp inline connectors just for this purpose.
     
  3. Grady Hollums

    Grady Hollums Second Unit

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    Well I went with the extra line and the bonding tape and the connector. I guess if the connector hurts the signal, then I can just go buy a amp, and see if that helps.

    I got the clamps for the ground wire and will apply it to the grounding rod. Thank you all for the help and I can't wait until Monday when my receiver/decoder come in to see HD on my TV!! Woo Hoo![​IMG]
     

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