HDTV 101 please help

Discussion in 'Displays' started by John S, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. John S

    John S Producer

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    I am fairly new here, and come from an audio engineer background. I came on here to research new ideas for possible upgrades to my HT.

    All that said, I have decided to make a jump to HDTV.

    I am such a novice at higher end video, I have a couple of basic questions.

    1. Widescreen -vs- Non-widescreen? Is one significantly better than the other from a pure enjoyment stand point, I have a ton of media in both formats.

    2. I have found a screaming deal on a Philips 60PP0202, but it seems it does not have comb filtering on the component video inputs. How important is comb filtering on component video DVD and HDTV input?

    Thanks in advance,
    John S.
     
  2. Tim K

    Tim K Second Unit

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    I'll take a shot at #1.

    Pure enjoyment?? Well, maybe a more natural experience. Think about your natural field of vision...because of the location of your eyes in your head, your field of view is much wider than it is high. You can see about 180 degrees left to right, but much less top to bottom. Ever notice the screen in a movie theater? Its much wider than it is high. Films....directors shoot in typically 2.35:1 or 1.85:1 aspect ratio, not 4:3. These ratios fill your field of vision, as well as present more information than a 4:3 image. So in that regard, a widescreen image is more natural than a 4:3 image.

    The question is, what material will you be viewing? If you will be watching alot of DVD's and HDTV, then go widescreen. If you watch more 4:3 standard TV, maybe a 4:3 set is more appropriate.
     
  3. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    In my opinion, widescreen is the only way to go. Yes, there is still a lot of 4:3 material on TV today, but widescreen is the wave of the future, and the amount of 4:3 programming will ONLY decrease in the future. To me, it doesn't make any sense to buy a set for the format that WILL (eventually) lose the war. Besides, the stretch modes that are available on some sets are exceptionally good and take perhaps a week to get used to. I watch virtually all 4:3 programming stretched on my set and am not at all distracted by "squished" people.

    On a pure "enjoyment" basis, I like the idea that watching widescreen movies on a 16:9 set becomes a "bigger" experience than watching regular TV. I know that's really fuzzy logic, but psychologically speaking, movies are supposed to be bigger and better than plain old TV, right?

    As for the comb filter question, I'm pretty sure that when using component inputs, there is no need for a comb filter. It's really only used for recombining the two signals carried via S-Video. Someone else can probably go into more detail on exactly why this is.

    Good luck with your purchase.

    -Jason
     
  4. John S

    John S Producer

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    Thanks for the good thoughts on it....

    I think it is going to come down to what will fit better, and even that is a trade off of sorts.

    I am upgrading from a 50" RP, I have both vertical and horizontal space limitations, I think the horizontle is going to win, so I am going for the non-widescreen, I got out a tape measurer over my lunch hour.

    The widescreen I would be considering is nearly 18" wider than what I have now. The non-widescreen is not quite 10" wider.

    Any ideas on how much diagonal picture in inches you get veiwing the narrowest widescreen format on a non widescreen 60" screen????
     
  5. John S

    John S Producer

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    Oooops not to mention the deal on the non-widescreen is $400 less in cost. :)
     
  6. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    A 60" diagonal 4:3 set has screen dimensions of 36" high and 48" wide (gotta love geometry and 3:4:5 right triangles).

    Assuming a widescreen aspect ratio of 2.35:1 (some movies are even more "wide" than that, but they're few and far between), and a picture width of 48", the widescreen image height works out to be 48/2.35 or 20.4".

    Technically speaking, measuring corner to corner would give you a diagonal measurement of just over 52".

    Examining the numbers a bit further, the 60" 4:3 screen has a total screen area of 1728 sq. in. When watching 2.35:1 movies, you're only using 979.2 sq. in. or just over 56% of the available screen area.

    Just a little food for thought! [​IMG]

    -Jason
     
  7. John S

    John S Producer

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    Wow.. Thanks for the break down....

    I think I can live with 52" diagonal widescreen for a while....

    Thanks a million, I am so mathmatically challenged.
     
  8. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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