HDMI receiver

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by PaulDW, Apr 7, 2006.

  1. PaulDW

    PaulDW Auditioning

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    Went to Best Buy and Sound Advice last night just to look around. Got talking about receivers as I'm in the market for one. Both sales guys recommended to go with a HDMI receiver.

    They said it's a case of "pay now or pay later" as that's where the technology is heading and I will need one in the future.

    My budget was $500, the cheapest HDMI receiver they had was close to $1000.

    Not sure what to do next, is the HDMI crucial and if it is, does anybody make a decent one closer to my budget?

    TIA
     
  2. James Edward

    James Edward Supporting Actor

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    Don't lose sleep over it. Just make sure you have an HDMI input on your TV for the upcoming HD-DVD players. Apparently it has been decided that HDMI is the only way that HD-DVD players will output HD.

    As far as connectivity goes, you can just plug the DVD player directly into the TV, without switching it through the receiver. Here is a quote from Barry Willis in The Perfect Vision, after testing many DVD players:
    "My tests for these reviews indicate that there is no justifiable reason to use HDMI...Any custom installer can offer plenty of anectodal evidence about implementation difficulties... In my view it's a flawed technology; as things stand right now, the best way to obtain reliably good images is to avoid HDMI and stick with analog component video."

    I concur- I avoid using HDMI in customer's homes because of the 'handshake issue', and also how easily the connector slips off. I initially thought it would be great, but it's just a pain in the rear.
     
  3. RichardH

    RichardH Supporting Actor

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    Don't worry about HDMI right now. Even the receivers that have it right now will be (somewhat) obsolete soon because they do not have HDMI 1.3, meaning they will not accept the upcoming Dolby True HD audio bitstream, which will be found on HD-DVD and Blu-Ray. In short, don't sweat it!
     
  4. Shane Harg

    Shane Harg Second Unit

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    Heh. Only when HD and Blu-Ray DVD titles outnumber SD DVD titles. Soon? Ever? Dream on...
    Don'tcha just hear the general public screaming out their demand for better resolution than standard definition DVD? In two different formats, no less? I fear HD-DVD and Blu-Ray is bound to remain in obscurity to all but the undying videophile, like SACD and DVD audio to the audiophile. I talk about SACD and DVD audio to friends and they just look at me like a deer in the headlights. Shoot, same goes for vinyl LP, for that matter.

    Point? HDMI 1.1, despite its growing pains, is a great way to connect your DVD player to your receiver and your receiver to your display. Works perfectly fine for me and in the long run will fair far better, IMO, than HD-DVD and Blu-Ray.
     
  5. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    Here's what I perceive is your choice in regards to your choice. Get what's out there now (even with HDMI) or wait for the dust to clear. It all depends on how desperate you are. HD-DVD and Blu-Ray is somewhat a ways off, but when the dust clears after this war, it will proven to be something you probably won't live without. Since this is a receiver issue I'll stick with it. There are a couple of formats to consider when determining the issue of HDMI on a receiver.
    DTS 96/24 and DTS-HD the second is Dolby Digital Plus and Dolby True HD.
    dts 96/24 - 5.1 channels of high resolution sound 96khz/24bit
    dts HD - Up to 7.1 channels of sound that's suppose to be bit by bit the same as the original master.
    Dolby Digital Plus - Up to 7.1 channels of sound
    Dolby True-HD - Upto 8 channels of sound like DTS HD a bit by bit replica of the master.
    If these four things are not an issue with you then your choice is easy, get what you want, something will sound good in the price range you are searching and be done with it. But if these are issues, then how long do you wait? I have an old HK AVR 500, before Dolby EX and DTS ES and I plan to wait for the next installation of High Def picture and sound before upgrading. The old receiver still works excellently, sounds great and I don't want to change just to change again. Hope this was helpful.
     
  6. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    So what was the main reason for introducing the HDMI format in the first place? I thought it was to deliver an all-digital signal from the player to the monitor & via a single cable.

    Is it the copy protection system that is screwing things up?
     
  7. JediFonger

    JediFonger Producer

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    http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/video...i-11-10-05.wmv

    sorry if it's been posted before. couldn't find it. i thought it was an illuminating chat about HDMI tech. it's basically a hardware spec that is enforced. everything else is software based.

    thus, blame HDCP, not HDMI!
     

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