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HDD installation question

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Armando Zamora, Jul 9, 2005.

  1. Armando Zamora

    Armando Zamora Second Unit

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    I'm not familiar with computer forums or "how-to" web sites, so I thought that I'd start here for some guidance...

    I have an 80GB Western Digital EIDE HDD installed in my older computer (Dell Dimension 8100) with tons of media files on it (music, picture, and video files). I just recently purchased a newer computer that uses the SATA interface/controller (?) for HDD. Ultimately, I will purchase another SATA HDD for the new computer and install it using RAID 0 configuration.

    I'd like to get all those media files transferred to the new computer. What is the best and most easiest way to accomplish this task? Is it possible to remove the EIDE HDD from my old computer and install it on my new computer? Or, am I stuck with having to transfer the media files using the traditional "copy to an external media" method?

    TIA and sorry for my ignorance.
     
  2. Mike_J_Potter

    Mike_J_Potter Second Unit

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    Yes you can easily move the EIDE drive over to the new PC, Just pull it out of the old computer then. Then you can use the IDE cable and power connection hooked into the CD/DVD drive (both plugs only go in one way. Make sure the Hard drive is the only drive on the cable and the jumper is set to single or cable select. The bios should pick it up but if it doesn't go into setup and make sure the drive detection are on auto. After that boot into windows and the drive should be there under my computer then copy away.
     
  3. Jeff Jacobson

    Jeff Jacobson Cinematographer

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    Another alternative (if both computers have Network Interface Cards) would be to connect both computers using a crossover cable.
     
  4. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    I would guess that both PCs are modern enough to have built-in ethernet cards, and at least one is a WinXP box. If that's the case, and you only want the data files on the old drive, you can set up a peer-to-peer (workgroup) network, make the drives shareable, then transfer the data via the ethernet cable. You can buy an ethernet cable cheap (or borrow one easily, I'm sure) and the whole process is very easy. (Just run the network wizard in Windows XP and it will take you through the whole process, including creating networking disc for a non-XP Windows PC if necessary.)

    The transfer time between two drives in the same PC would be faster, but the set-up is more of a pain, especially if you're not comfortable getting under the hood of a PC. The ethernet connection is a bit slower, but the setup is fairly quick, and once the process starts it runs unattended. You can get it going and then go have lunch (or start it in the morning and go to work.) After a few seconds a counter should pop up showing how many bytes have been and need to be transferred and the time remaining, so you'll know just when to come back to the PCs.

    Just another suggestion.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  5. Armando Zamora

    Armando Zamora Second Unit

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    Excellent!!!! I forgot about networking the two boxes (both running WinXP) and doing it this way. I wasn't thinking "out-of-the-box". Thanks All.
     
  6. Matt Wright

    Matt Wright Stunt Coordinator

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    The Ethernet option is only really efficient if you are talking about moving over some Word documents, Bookmarks, etc. If you are trying to move over say 40GB of MP3s or something of that nature you'll be sitting around waiting for a while. 100Mbit Ethernet typically has a real-world throughput of ~50Mbit/sec. Note that is Megabits per second to get that into a useful number it must be converted to Megabytes per second. This results in 12.5MB/s for the theortetical 100Mbit speed and more like 6.25MB/s for the real-world throughput.
     
  7. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    The time issue is addressed above. And "efficiency" is a relative term. If time isn't critical (and there's nothing in Armando's post to suggest it is) it can be more efficient for someone not familiar with hardware upgrades and component swapping to take the slower network route than try to move drives around and spend hours dealing with hardware conflicts, jumper settings, BIOS updates and the headaches or loose cables (including the ones on other components that you accidentally knocked loose when fiddling with the one you were actually working on.)

    If Armando saw an advantage in adding the storage space of his older (and slower) drive to his new system I would have recommended installing it as a permanent internal drive or even buying a $40 external USB 2.0 drive enclosure from CompUSA and turning it into a permenent external drive. But if all he wants to do is transfer his data from the old to the new PC and leave the original disk (which he'll presumably wipe) intact in the old computer, the networking solution seems the most sensible - and yes, efficient - way to go.

    Regards,

    Joe
     

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