HD "filming" and storage questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Steven_ R, Oct 9, 2002.

  1. Steven_ R

    Steven_ R Agent

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    I finally have an HD STB and have noticed quite a range of image quality from various "HD" material. Some of the network TV shows look OK, but not great. What does HBO, for example, use to store and replay the HD movies? Is there some kind of digital tape that has the ability to store the extra resolution of HD material? Why have several posts suggested that live HD, like sporting events, is a better image than non-live material. Similarly, in order for a TV show to be HD, is it filmed with special cameras? Or, is it just like any other video and the only difference is the way in which it is broadcast?

    Thanks in advance for any explanations.

    Steve
     
  2. Christopher Collins

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    The HDTV process is a complete retooling from cameras, to editing, sound production and even over into broadcast. It all takes new hardware. Storage as far as im aware would also be digital. There are many editing systems these days that work with HD/Film resolution material and they use arrays of fast hard drives to store the information.

    I dont see how a HD movie would have less resolution / clarity than a recorded show. Im not sure on the camera specs and what resolution that HD is natively record in , but film is in a whole class by itself. Film grain has the unique ability of being more than one color, so you get an almost infinate color palett depending on the quality of the film used. Digital is a sampeling of this palet and will probably not ever be able to exactly match Film for that reason.

    Either way, film to HD conversion or Straight to HD via harware capture from a HD equipped camera should have the same quality if processed the same. So I guess the quality comes down to the quality of the HD hardware / software used to process the signal. So if the movie was recorded and archived in low resolution than yes , HD would look worse, but if they use the actuall film to do the encoding it would be just as good as that from an HD camera.
     
  3. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    The filming is the same for most network shows. Most shows are, and have been, in 35mm. Live stuff looks clearer or better because it's on HD Video, which means there is no film grain to deal with. A lot of people perceive that as better.

    CSI on CBS looks better than anything I've seen on HBO. A lot of HBO stuff is transfered to video at it's OAR and then digitally zoomed to fill up the screen. It's really noticable on some films (see Moulin Rouge this month)

    A lot of the HD stuff on HBO looks great though, you're right. And the upconverted HD stuff on HBO looks by far the best of anyone. Most of the networks are going through a composite step. It would appear that HBO never has to go down this low in quality.

    Video v. film defiantley don't look the same, but people seem to view grain on their as 'bad' for some reason. Most of the stuff on HDnet is shot on video and has the very clear look to it (though some of it is from the mid/late 90's and presumably converted from the Japanese HD format, based on the credits (which is 1125i, IIRC))
     
  4. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Is the frame rate an issue here too? I've noticed video shot in HD has a much smoother scrolling/panning than film.

    Also, I've noticed (at least on HD demos, anyway) that HD video is often shot with an infinite depth of focus. Meaning objects in the background are in focus as well as the foreground objects. This could be percieved to be a clearer picture over film with a more narrow DOF.
     
  5. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    Film is (often) 24, HD video is usually 60.

    But since 24 isn't a multiple of 60 the pans become jerky, instead of smooth (beyond the difference in frame rate.)
     

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