HD DVD: 1080p

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by rodney_g, Jul 9, 2006.

  1. rodney_g

    rodney_g Extra

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    Hi, all,

    Compared to most if not all of you, I am an ignoramus when it comes to home theater technology.

    I have been reading a lot on this forum, trying to learn and understand. I am trying to make a decision on a player. I have a 4-yr old Mitsubishi CRT rear projection HDTV with component inputs, but am considering a new display, also.

    Please answer/correct me if I am wrong in any of these:

    - Both Toshiba HD-A1 and RCA HDV5000 output 1080i through component.
    - I see a big deal being made about DTS-HD and how the current Toshiba HD-A1 (or its current version of HDMI) doesn't have DTS-HD capability. Toshiba's website says the player has "DTS-HD decoder built in." Is it or is it not DTS-HD capable?
    - I understand that HD DVD releases are mastered in 1080p, or at least some. Are there any plans by any manufacturers to make a HD DVD player that outputs 1080p, or is that even possible given the technolgy?
    - x:x pulldown, scanning, etc.: these terms give me a headache, so I'll just ask this question: if I end up buying a 1080p display, will there be a difference in picture quality between:
    1. a 1080p-mastered HD DVD release played out of the HD-A1 at 1080i through HDMI, where the display does its conversion to 1080p;
    and
    2. the same release played through a new HD DVD player that IS capable of 1080p output?

    Thank you very much,
    Rodney
     
  2. Travis Hedger

    Travis Hedger Supporting Actor

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    - Both Toshiba HD-A1 and RCA HDV5000 output 1080i through component.

    Yes

    - I see a big deal being made about DTS-HD and how the current Toshiba HD-A1 (or its current version of HDMI) doesn't have DTS-HD capability. Toshiba's website says the player has "DTS-HD decoder built in." Is it or is it not DTS-HD capable?

    Yes, but limited to only 5.1 channels of DTS HD (the sticker or card label says "DTS Core) meaning 5.1 channel support, not 7.1. And not via HDMI, only via onboard decoder, in which you would feed to a 5.1 analog input on your receiver.

    - I understand that HD DVD releases are mastered in 1080p, or at least some. Are there any plans by any manufacturers to make a HD DVD player that outputs 1080p, or is that even possible given the technolgy?

    Yes and Yes.

    If you had a 1080p set now, fed with DVI/HDMI it would properly de-interlace the 1080i back to a 1080p signal, so it makes the above question moot as with a proper display, whether it is fed 1080i or 1080p, 1080p is the result, the exact bit for bit image encoded. And 1080i looks frigging awesome already (I have a 65 inch Mitsubishi Diamond with 9 inch CRT guns)

    - x:x pulldown, scanning, etc.: these terms give me a headache, so I'll just ask this question: if I end up buying a 1080p display, will there be a difference in picture quality between:

    1. a 1080p-mastered HD DVD release played out of the HD-A1 at 1080i through HDMI, where the display does its conversion to 1080p;
    and

    See above

    2. the same release played through a new HD DVD player that IS capable of 1080p output?

    See above
     
  3. rodney_g

    rodney_g Extra

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    Travis,

    I really appreciate your quick and concise reponses.

    : the reason I asked that question is because I'd like to buy the HD-A1 now, and I didn't want to later feel like if I had waited for a 1080p player, I would have gotten a better picture on a 1080p display.

    Thanks again,
    Rodney
     
  4. Travis Hedger

    Travis Hedger Supporting Actor

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    Enjoy now, and enjoy later! You won't be sorry.
     

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