HD, DGT, STD Transfers difference?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by paul:hillsdon, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. paul:hillsdon

    paul:hillsdon Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can anyone tell me whats the difference between a HD, DIGITAL, and STANDARD tranfer for a DVD? Is HD more resolution, better quality than the others? Thanks all.
     
  2. Dan Rudolph

    Dan Rudolph Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    4,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    For a standard transfer, they scan a print of the film (or the negative) and use that.

    HD transfers are down-converted from a master at HDTV resolutions. (Usually 1920x1080). The HD master is created in the same way as a standard transfer, they just scan at higher resolutions.

    Digital transfers are for films who made made in the digital realm. Most animation, 2d or 3d, is made on computers these days and some movies (Attack of the Clones, Once Upon a Time in Mexico) are filmed with digital cameras. You just convert the original staight to DVD resolutions inside of printing the movie onto film and scanning it back in.

    DVD always has the same resolution (720x480 NTSC, can't remember PAL), but direct-digital transfers have better quality since they don't have to go through a film step and HD masters can be down-converted to NTSC and PAL, plus you have one for HDTV showing and eventual HDDVD release, so it's just less trouble in the end.
     
  3. BrionL

    BrionL Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2004
    Messages:
    223
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know if this helps but here is a little information for you.

    SDTV=480i(normal NTSC standard)
    EDTV=480p(progressive scan, better image that SDTV)
    HDTV=720p and 1080i(best picture possible, better than EDTV)

    Brion
     
  4. Darren Pillans

    Darren Pillans Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2000
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    0
    Anyone got the PAL stats?
     
  5. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

    Joined:
    May 8, 2000
    Messages:
    1,500
    Likes Received:
    0


    ... but there is so much that can and does happen during / after the transfer (poor compression, filtering, scaling) that they aren't necessarily better quality. Depending on the digital source, they have the potential to be better.

    -Scott
     
  6. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2

    That's not the customary meaning of the term "digital transfer". The concept of a "transfer" involves shifting something from a film source to a video medium. Content created in the digital realm doesn't originate on film, and there's no "transfer" involved, in the traditional sense.

    The term "digital transfer" generally denotes a process in which a film is scanned to a digital file, which can then be manipulated in various ways before being exported to either an analog medium (laserdisc, VHS) or a digital one (DVD). There was a time (mostly pre-DVD) when the term "digital transfer" was meaningful because such transfers weren't the norm. In the early days of home video, films were scanned to analog video (usually professional-quality videotape), which left the process vulnerable to all sorts of analog interference. The introduction of digital transfers in the 90s resulted in a significant improvement in the quality of home video products. The immediate beneficiaries were those with laserdisc players.

    Today nearly all transfers are digital.

    M.
     
  7. Vincent_P

    Vincent_P Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Messages:
    1,873
    Likes Received:
    207
    :: Darren Pillans- Anyone got the PAL stats?

    PAL = 576 X 720

    Vincent
     

Share This Page