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**** HBO's BAND OF BROTHERS: The True Story Of Easy Company.

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by Tino, Sep 9, 2001.

  1. Tino

    Tino Executive Producer
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    Of course, and as usual, Part 9 "Why We Fight" directed by David Frankel was another excellent episode.
    In the making of special, Mr Frankel tells how special it was for him to direct this episde since he lost family members in camps such as the one shown in this episode.
    In regard to the prisoners appearance, remember that this was a work camp, not an extermination camp, relatively small and designed to produce war goods so keeping them alive to work was it's goal.
    Winters is quoted in the book, after seeing these poor souls behind the fence, "Now I know why I am here."
    ------------------
    Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus.
     
  2. Sean Cauley

    Sean Cauley Stunt Coordinator

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    Danny R:
    Any of the repeats on the main HBO channel will be widescreen. All airings on HBO Plus are P&S. I know that there should be repeats at 11 p.m. Tuesday and 10 p.m. Wednesday (this is HBO's typical repeat schedule for its Sunday 9 p.m. series). There may also be a late-night (11 or later) Saturday repeat; they usually had one with The Sopranos.
     
  3. Allen Hirsch

    Allen Hirsch Supporting Actor

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    Tino-
    thanks for that clarification.
    I now recall from the episode, when asked who they were and/or what they did, the prisoner who answered rattled off a number of work occupations - which now makes more sense, since it was a work concentration camp.
    Very harrowing episode, especially to see the hell Nixon was going through personally at that point - that close to the end of the war, and his wife is divorcing him.
    I'm now reading Ambrose's book, The Wild Blue, on the boys who flew B-24s over Germany (including George McGovern), thanks to this series.
     
  4. Allen Hirsch

    Allen Hirsch Supporting Actor

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    One shocking fact (at least to me) from Ambrose's other book, The Wild Blue:
    in 1940, the size of our army made us only the 16th biggest military in the world - right after Romania!!
     
  5. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

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    Yes, the United States was not a superpower until after WW2. Isolationism was the rule of the day, except in regard to the America's where the Monroe Doctrine was the rule. For many people in the US, Hitler was Europe's problem, and a standing army was of little use if you didn't meddle outside your own domain.
    When Japan bombed us, they truly did awaken a "Sleeping Giant"
     
  6. Geno

    Geno Supporting Actor

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    Does anyone know when the DVD's will be out? I want my parents to see this miniseries but they have NEVER had cable. [Maybe that is why I have spent so much on making my homt theater [​IMG]]
     
  7. Chad Beaudin

    Chad Beaudin Agent

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    Historical Question:
    Were the concentration camps and work camps not widely known until after the war? The soldiers came across the camp and were surprised by it. I had thought that those camps were known during the majority of the war, but this does not seem to be the case.
     
  8. Paul Jenkins

    Paul Jenkins Supporting Actor

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    Chad,
    It is my understanding from history books that most 'regular' people had no idea of what Germany was doing to the Jews and ethnic minorities. Many claim that the leaders of the Allies knew, but remember there wasn't a CNN providing 24x7 coverage of the war from deep within German territory...
    There are really good web sites that chronical the concentration camp stories, they are quite horrific to view and read, actually. A good synopsis of the Allied troops is here
     
  9. Rob Willey

    Rob Willey Screenwriter

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    From what I've heard the majority of the horror of the Holocaust came out after the war. Some anecdotal evidence filtered out during the war, but it wasn't generally accepted that it was true until the Allies started liberating the camps.
    Rob
    ------------------
    "That suits me down to the ground."
     
  10. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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  11. todbnla

    todbnla Screenwriter

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    Anyone want to sell me a VHS copy of the final episode since we moved and the HBO connection is not up yet? [​IMG]
    I would be glad to pay for the tape and shipping, PLEASE LMK!
    Thanks! [​IMG]
    Now how long till the dvd comes out??
    ------------------
    Regards,
    Todd

    My HT

    [Edited last by Todd Barattini on November 04, 2001 at 09:20 PM]
     
  12. Alex Spindler

    Alex Spindler Producer

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    Well, the conclusion was ... concluding. The experience of taking the Eagle's Nest was fairly anticlimactic with Hitler already dead, so there was little conflict remaining. This episode dealt with as much a wrap up of the lives as anything, and included an effective and enthusiastic brief by Winters of the fate of the men. Particularly effective was the testimony of the real men themselves, Winters included, as well as a perfect closing quote.
    The speech by the SS (?) Commander was also well handled, and it was easy to place the words in an Allied commanders mouth should things have turned out differently.
    A fitting conclusion to the series, and I was glad that the company was able to end the war in peace.
     
  13. Phil Florian

    Phil Florian Screenwriter

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    Fans of the 1930's Chaplin movie, "The Great Dictator" (or was it "The Little Dictator?") would have known SOMETHING was up, as it depicted the clearing out of Jewish neighborhoods as early as, I think, 1938, no? Or am I mixing up my history. I think people knew, but like our own current issues, it didn't matter until it became personal. This isn't to say that it was wide knowledge, but the people that needed to know surely knew.
    Phil
    ------------------
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes.
     
  14. todd s

    todd s Lead Actor

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    I loved the scene where Winters and Sobel meet again. Winters(who now outranks Sobel) was able to get the little dig. "Salute to rank, not the man". Also, it was funny to see the real Guannere(sp) the actor was right on with his lip and speech.
     
  15. Todd Terwilliger

    Todd Terwilliger Screenwriter

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    The scene with Sobel was great. I also loved the scene with Winters, et al listening to the German general address his men.
    ------------------
    Todd.
    "Ah, mercury, sweetest of the transitional metals..."
    - Sealab 2021
     
  16. Jon_B

    Jon_B Screenwriter

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    It's sad to see this great show come to an end. The baseball game at the end really was a good closure to the show. It was interesting to me to learn where some of the men now reside. I look forward to next weeks interviews.
    Jon
     
  17. Tino

    Tino Executive Producer
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    Points directed by Mikael Salomon was a satisfying conclusion of a great series.
    Finding out the identities of the men telling their stories was very touching. The series as a whole was very faithful to the book thankfully, and to history for that matter.
    In regard to my description of the Nazi work camp, that is directly from Mr. Ambrose's book.
    Band Of Brothers was truly great and epic series from beginning to end.
    My favorite quote from the series was from Dick Winters:
    "My grandson asked me the other day, 'Were you a hero in the war?'
    "No, but I served in a company of Heroes"

    Kudos to Mr's. Spielberg, Hanks, Ambrose and Co. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    ------------------
    Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus.
     
  18. Stacy Huff

    Stacy Huff Second Unit

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    I watched last night's episode, and I didn't want it to end. In fact, tonight I went back and watched my tape of the first night. At some point I'll have to watch the whole thing again, but it is an emotionally powerful series. I just can't do it at once.
    Needless to say I am a fan. More than anything I would like to meet the real Dick Winters and just shake his hand and tell him thanks. From the way he was depicted in the series, and from what I've read in the book, he was truly a man worthy of respect and admiration, as shown by the devotion of those who served with him. He is the real deal. I've also become a fan of Damien Lewis. Tonight while watching the first episode, I got to see the little blurb from the premiere night, with the little quotes from Speilberg, Hanks, and the actors. I was very surprised to hear Damien Lewis speaking with an English accent! I had no idea. What else has he been in? Was he in one of Guy Ritchie's movies?
    Speaking of Guy Ritchie, was one of the NCO's who resigned in episode 1 the stupid brother in Snatch, the one who wanted to own a gun?
    I can't wait now for the DVD set, although it will pale in comparison to HBO HD.
    Last night's episode was rather surreal, which is I suppose the way it felt for the men who lived it. Only when they got to the Eagle's Nest did I realize that I had once been there. As a 6 year old in the mid-1970s my family visited Germany, where my uncle was stationed in Munich. We went to the Eagle's Nest, and I rode in that very elevator they described last night. Even at that young age I found it somewhat eerie to think that I was standing in the same elevator that Hitler had used, that I was looking into a gilded mirror that at one time had reflected the very image of evil. Very creepy.
    That brings me to my comments about the work camp survivors. I in no way meant to imply anything negative about the show, or the way the scene was portrayed. While there are method actors who will do nearly anything for a role, I don't think they've invented the actor who will put himself through that type of horror to achieve the look of a death camp survivor. Rather, my point was simply that no matter how hard a film-maker might try to be accurate, no matter how horrendous they make it look, I think it will always pale in comparison to the real thing.
    I'm eager to see the documentary and to see more from the real men. It is uncanny the way that the actor who played Bill Guannare managed to get his mouth and speech so perfectly. And how about Compton? Prosecuting Sirhan Sirhan! Wow! And Webster. He's quoted so often in the book. From the way he was shown in the series, I can imagine him setting sail on that boat.
    One thing that I wonder is how much these men kept in touch over the years. On the one hand, it seems as if going through all that they went through together really would bind them in a way that would make them more than family. On the other hand, after the horrors, I could also understand a man who never wanted to see or hear anything that might remind him of lost friends and the terrible things he'd seen. In fact, the whole bit with Winters and Nixon, and the job offer, made me think just how difficult it must have been to let go after that whole ordeal. How do you go back to a normal life? How do you manage not having to sleep in a hole, not having to worry about somebody shooting you? How do you come down from that? I hope that the documentary gives us some insight.
    Finally, does anybody know if there is some way that we could write to these survivors? Like I said, I'd just like an opportunity to say thanks.
    Anyway, this post has now lasted about as long as all 10 episodes, so...
     
  19. Chad Beaudin

    Chad Beaudin Agent

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    What is the word on the DVD? I thought I read previously in the thread that HBO "currently did not have plans" to release the DVD any time soon. Can anyone shed any light on the subject?
    ------------------
     
  20. Alex Spindler

    Alex Spindler Producer

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    I think you're thinking of Dexter Fletcher. He was in Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels as Soap.
     

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