Having a problem with my Receiver

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jason Tracewell, Nov 1, 2001.

  1. Jason Tracewell

    Jason Tracewell Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello everyone..
    I recently purchased my first receiver (JVC RX-6000vbk) and I have run into a little problem, I think.. I set up my receiver and once everything was plugged in, I realized that when I switched it into full theater mode, like Dolby Digital or Surround, that the center channel sounds like crap. It sounds like the sound drops out at the end of whatever is being played, mainly noticeable during dialogue. I switched out the center speaker with one of my main speakers to make sure it wasn't the speaker that was bad and still the problem persisted. So my question is: is this a hardware problem with my receiver? Does anyone have any suggestions? It seems to happen on all my modes (ie: DVD, VCR, TV) and I have my DVD hooked up through a digital cable and my TV and VCR through RCA cables. The other speakers seem to work fine, it's just the center one that seems a little off.. Any help with my problem would be greatly appreciated! If more information is need, I would be happy to provide that as well!
    Thanks,
    -Jason
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Supporting Actor

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    Can you hookup your left speaker to the center channel output and see if it sounds ok? If it still sounds "off" then there's probably something wrong with the decoder/amplifier/pre-amplifier stage. If it sounds fine with the left speaker then your center speaker may be damaged or defective.
    ------------------
    My Home Theater Page
     
  3. Tom Vodhanel

    Tom Vodhanel Cinematographer

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    Also be sure to calibrate the system with a SPL meter. And if the receiver allows...set the distance/delay between all the speakers and the center. It's sounds like there's something seriously amiss with the receiver(as ned noted)...but sometimes just getting the calibration/distance setup nailed can make a big difference.
    TV
     
  4. Jason Tracewell

    Jason Tracewell Stunt Coordinator

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    I did hook up my left speaker to my center and my center to my left and then my main sounded 'off' and my center speaker sounded fine, so I assumed the speakers were okay.. I just wanted to make sure before I took the receiver in to get serviced. I didn't want to waste my time if I didn't have to.. The nearest service center is about an hour away. Hopefully it's not an expensive problem.. As for a SPL meter, I don't know what that is (I'm learning as I go here [​IMG] ), but I did switch the delay settings and that didn't help either, unfortunately.. Thanks for the help guys, I really appreciate it!
    Thanks again,
    -Jason
     
  5. Seth T

    Seth T Stunt Coordinator

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    An SPL (Sound Pressure Level) Meter is a little gadget that basically measures...well...SPL. They're around $35 at Radio Shack. There's other threads here that go into a LOT more detail than I can provide...I'm not too technical either.
    The basic concept is you sit in the sweet spot with the SPL meter. Then you put your Receiver in calibration mode, so that you're getting white noise moving from speaker to speaker. Then you watch the meter and raise or lower the volume of each speaker so that when you're done, each speaker is outputting the same amount of decibles (DB).
    The reason for this is so that you don't, for instance, have your rear right surround louder then all the rest of the speakers. That would throw the imagine way off.
    There's two different kinds of meters: analog and digital. The analog at my Radio Shack was about $35, and the digital was about 60. Get the analog one, as it has a little meter with a wire that gives you instant readout. I've never tried the digital ones, but everything I've read on HTF indicates it's not as good for this purpose.
    That's basically it.
    Good luck on your problem!
    -Seth
     
  6. Tom Vodhanel

    Tom Vodhanel Cinematographer

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    Also be sure to check the basics,
    make sure the wiring is OK(try another piece)...make sure there's no loose strands touching one another on either end of the connections. Make sure you're using the right output terminals for the center speaker. You can try setting the receiver up to center channel small/large/no. See if that changes anything(no will reroute the signal to your mains) see if your mains then become bad sounding.
    TV
     
  7. Jason Tracewell

    Jason Tracewell Stunt Coordinator

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    I'll try setting my center speaker to no to see if that works. If my front speakers sound bad on that setting, what would that mean? and if they sounded okay in that setup? (They wouldn't happen to have a book: Setting up your Receiver - For Dummies, would they?) [​IMG] The wiring was one of the first things I tried since I thought maybe it was bad, so the wiring SHOULD be fine. And actually the first thing I thought was that I had hooked it up backwards, but I checked and even switched them and both ways actually sounded the same..
    Thanks!
    -Jason
     
  8. Jason Tracewell

    Jason Tracewell Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, I switched off my center speaker so that the center channel split into the two front speakers and that seem to sound fine (no drop-out, really clean). So my guess is that somewhere between the output of the center signal and the actual connectors, something isn't wired right.. If anyone knows for sure, or can further isolate the problem, that would be great (I can tell the guy who will end up fixing it exactly what's wrong!). Thanks for all your guys help... I really appreciate it!
    -Jason
     
  9. Tom Vodhanel

    Tom Vodhanel Cinematographer

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    Well,it's note a processing issue then...seems more of a possible issue with the center channel amplification itself maybe? Does the receiver have a center channel preout jack by any chance? You could try using an outboard amp to make sure....but at this point...I'd be exchanging it.
    TV
     

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