Has anyone ever done this?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by shane^f, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. shane^f

    shane^f Auditioning

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    I am making a new room an I was wondering if anyone has made a room with any wall,floor,ceiling not parallel to another?
    This should all but eliminate standing waves, maybe?
    Shane[​IMG]
     
  2. shane^f

    shane^f Auditioning

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    oops
     
  3. Erik Farstad

    Erik Farstad Supporting Actor

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    Shane, yes it's been done and you can help eliminate many acoustical problems by doing this. You just don't want to do it, for the sake of doing it, for you could experience worse problems if not designed properly.
     
  4. shane^f

    shane^f Auditioning

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    Please shed some light on these problems. My room is VERY bad with standing waves, so bad 4 18" woofers in all corners but NO BASS in listening position. These are JBL 2242's (800 w) in 10 cu ft boxes with crown K2's on them. Thats more than most night clubs!! Walk into a corner or upstairs and my house is comming apart! 132db of comming apart!
     
  5. Erik Farstad

    Erik Farstad Supporting Actor

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    Shane, it sounds like your subwoofers are cancelling each other out...try two in oposite corners...have you checked for phase cancellation?

    As for "problems," as with any acoustical situation...it all depends...changing something just one inch can have a good or bad affect...by creating an aditional null point for instance.

    "In theory" though, non parallel walls do help, not hurt. But without seeing your room, knowing the exact dimensions, it's hard to say anything concretely.
     
  6. Owen Bartley

    Owen Bartley Second Unit

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    I think the phase of your woofers needs to be checked too. I had a similar thing happening back with only a pair of 12" Cerwin Vegas.. when I added a 10" sub dedicated to the LFE channel, I was getting LESS bass! But in that case I just switched the phase of the sub by reversing the + and - speaker inputs and it sounded better.

    When I got my Tempest built, I tuned it in by running test tones on repeat and slowly turning the phase from 0 to 180 and back, trying to find the peak. I ended up with it somewhere around the 10 or 11 o'clock position. (I did this with the mains running full range since they were the only other source of bass)

    What you might want to do is turn off 3 of your subs, and play with the phase on #1 till it sounds right, then leave it on and move to #2, then #3, etc. Its worth a try at least!
     
  7. RobbieP

    RobbieP Agent

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    does having a cathedral style ceiling help with this concept??? and does it matter which direction the angles are??? for example, my living room has a cathedral ceiling, but the apex runs perpendicular to the viewing direction.

    -------|-------
    couch--|-----tv
    -------|-------

    the | is the apex of the cathedral ceiling.
     
  8. JohnnyN

    JohnnyN Stunt Coordinator

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    adjust your listening position? check your room modes?
     
  9. Erik Farstad

    Erik Farstad Supporting Actor

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    Robbie, every room, and it's shape, will interact and carry their own acoustical "issues" as they interact and relate to the location and placement of your speakers and other "boundaries" within the room. Again, depending on all of this variables...it could be either good or bad. Unless you delve into the room and have an acoustical analysis done...there's no "sure thing fix" for any room/shape...there are too many variables. Again, there are some "standards" but each room is unique and should be treated as such.
     

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