Hard-wiring a projector: Is this dangerous?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by David Tolsky, May 8, 2003.

  1. David Tolsky

    David Tolsky Supporting Actor

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    As I am running cables in my walls I have a decision to make. Do I run the power cable through the wall, then back out under the electrical box to plug in? Or do I cut open the power cord and splice it directly into the electrical wiring? If I did the latter, I could just unplug it from the projector itself until I needed to use it? Is there any danger in splicing into existing wiring?
     
  2. Chip_Slattery

    Chip_Slattery Stunt Coordinator

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    David,

    Your first option is most certainly illegal. You aren't allowed to run power or extension cords through a wall.

    As for the splicing, is this simply a case of your not having an outlet near the projector? Rather than going through all of the trouble hacking your power cable why not just run a leg off the existing outlet and put another outlet near the projector?

    I apologize if I've misinterpreted what you're trying to do, but I have to believe there's a better option than splicing into the power cable.
     
  3. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    I believe both options would be serious code violations. If there's a fire and your jimmie-rigged wiring is the culprit you could have major insurance problems. Do it the right way and have an outlet run to the projector.
     
  4. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Neil Joseph
    Do you have access to do a run from the electrical panel to the projector area and mount a ceiling-mounted electrical outlet? You could do a dedicated run so that the projector is the only device using that breaker.
     
  5. David Tolsky

    David Tolsky Supporting Actor

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    You guys are all right. I already have the sections of drywall out so I can splice in another romex line from the box below, up into the ceiling to another outlet box. That way I don't even need to use an extension cord. I already have 25' of thicker guage Romex that I could use. Although the house seems to be using a flat, thinner type of cable. Can I still use my thicker guage wire in an existing electrical system?
    PS: This is a 2nd story room with no access to a panel.
     
  6. MikeWh

    MikeWh Second Unit

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  7. Drew Eckhardt

    Drew Eckhardt Stunt Coordinator

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    1. As long as you use at least 12G Romex for a circuit with a 20A breaker and 14G for 15A, you're legal.

    2. Also note that there are box-fill limitations. The electrical boxes are either standard dimensions or have a cubic-inch number stamped on them. In either case, a 14G conductor counts as 2 inches and 12G as 2.25. All of the grounds count as as single wire of the largest size. All of the internal clamps count as a single largest wire. Each device (outlet/switch) counts as 2 wires. The total cubic inches used must be
     

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