Hard drive enclosure kit question

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Tim L, Nov 14, 2005.

  1. Tim L

    Tim L Second Unit

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    My computer died and does not reconize any HD that I put into it- so I picked up a new computer. It uses the newer sata drives so I cannot plug my older ones in to retriecve my information. Someone mentioned that I should try a HD enclosure kit-I have never used one- do you simpky place your HD into it and then plug into your computer via usb/firewire and then retrieve all your info? sounds simple enough
    but is is really that simple? Anyone have any recommedations or experience using one of these? I saw one in this weks Bestbuy flyer for around $40, any input appreciated
    Tim
     
  2. Anthony Moore

    Anthony Moore Supporting Actor

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    I use this method all the time. About a year ago I picked up 10 HD enclosures for future use. Theyre cheaper in bulk. I bought from ebay. For 10 I paid $100. If you just want 1, I would say you can find one for around $20 . Just make sure it has a fan. If not, theyll burn out quicker.

    Once I had my enclosure I was ready to start buying HD's as needed. I just bought IDE drives, stuck them in the enclosure, then connected the USB from the external case to my computer. It was that easy. Only other thing I had to do was go into COMPUTER MANAGEMENT in the control panel and format it. It takes about 5 minutes to do so.

    But then thats it. You have an external hard drive for cheaper than if you bought one thats made to be external.

    Good luck
     
  3. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    It really works quite well. You want to have USB2 in your computer but new ones do have that by default.

    Just insert the drive into the enclosure, connect the internal power and IDE cables and then plug in the USB cable and the drive pops up in Windows. Very nifty.

    I use a 300GB disk in an external enclosure as a data backup device. Fast, relatively affordable and stores a lot.
     
  4. Tim L

    Tim L Second Unit

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    sounds good- but do I need to format the drive first? or can I just bring up the info thats already on it-only asking because I want to keep whats already on the exsisting drive. Also this drives sits outside the tower- I don't have to open up the tower or anyting like that do I? (only asking because I am not that computer saavy) it would be nice if it worked like any ohter external device. thanks for the info so far
    Tim
     
  5. Paul Padilla

    Paul Padilla Supporting Actor

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    Formatting destroys your data! Proceed carefully.

    A couple of questions, though.

    What kind of hard drive are we talking about? Did this hard drive you're referring to not come from inside the old machine? You seem skiddish about opening up your new machine to work on the internal components and you mention that the drive "sits outside of the tower". If it wasn't already part of an external drive enclosure, how was it connected externally to the old machine?

    Regardless if the new machine uses a Serial ATA hard drive, it should still have at least one IDE connector on the motherboard for the CD-Rom. You should still be able to connect the drive internally on the new machine.
     
  6. Tim L

    Tim L Second Unit

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    yes the older drives were internal drives(which I do not want to format until I retrieve my info first)- I meant does the enclosure kit sit outside the tower as an external HD would and then I would just place the older drive inside the enclosure and then plug it in via USB. And yes I do not wish to open up the tower and start tinkering around with hookin gup stuff because I am not that computer saavy when it comes to that..to put it simply I was hoping the enclosure kit works likes this
    -place older drive in kit
    -plug enlosure kit via usb into computer
    -retrieve info off older drive
    is this correct? sorry for all the questions, but thanks for the responses
    Tim
     
  7. Greg.K

    Greg.K Screenwriter

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    It should work exactly like that, assuming the hard drive is functioning. I bought one of these enclosures for a spare laptop hard drive I had no other use for and now I have very useful a 40MB USB2 portable drive for under $20.
     
  8. Tim L

    Tim L Second Unit

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    well if thats the case I'm a happy man then- and yes the drive should work fine (it was my secondary drive in my other computer) so why should anyone bother to buy an external drive then? this seems to work the same and for less money? Also I noticed some support 2.5" and/or 3.5" drives- I'm assuming the norm is 3.5?
    Tim
     
  9. Greg.K

    Greg.K Screenwriter

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    2.5" is standard for laptops/notebooks. 3.5" for desktops.

    If it was your secondary drive you probably need to set jumpers on it to set it as the master drive before you put it in the enclosure. But the instructions for the enclosure should say for sure.
     
  10. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    I'd say they are all expecting a drive set as master, but that's not difficult. The drives usually have printed instructions somewhere as to how you set the jumpers to get them into master mode.
     

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