Hamilton (2020)

Adam Lenhardt

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Yes. But not even really to the degree that the full word is heard. On the explicit version of the cast album, in the song Say No To This, if you listen to the lyric very carefully, Miranda says "fu--" but trails off without finishing the word. So you don't hear the "-uck."
I'm wondering if that is the case with the performance they used for this. The only other f-bomb I can think of is in "The Adams Administration", but that one was bleeped for comedic effect even in the live performances.
 

Jake Lipson

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I'm wondering if that is the case with the performance they used for this.
I suspect so. As far as I can recall, it was also the case when I saw the show.

The only other f-bomb I can think of is in "The Adams Administration", but that one was bleeped for comedic effect even in the live performances.
I suspect that one will stay exactly as-is with the bleeping. There's no reason to change that.

The other two (which are being edited) are "I get the fuck back up again" in "Yorktown" and "southern motherfuckin' Democratic Republicans" in "Washington On Your Side."
 

Greg.K

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"southern motherfuckin' Democratic Republicans"

The only one I'm sad to see bleeped. But I guess since it's shouted and not subtle like the half-f-bomb in "Say No to This", it had to get the axe.

Because There Would Be Complaints.
 
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Greg.K

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I've watched it twice so far. It's great to see the original cast perform.

Though I kind of wish they'd have two versions of this film - this one, and one with the full stage in view at all times to see the full effects of the lighting and ensemble performances.
 

Robert Crawford

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I've watched it twice so far. It's great to see the original cast perform.

Though I kind of wish they'd have two versions of this film - this one, and one with the full stage in view at all times to see the full effects of the lighting and ensemble performances.
This was a terrific viewing experience for me as I viewed it in 4K/Dolby Vision/Atmos.
 
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Jake Lipson

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Though I kind of wish they'd have two versions of this film - this one, and one with the full stage in view at all times to see the full effects of the lighting and ensemble performances.
I actually don't mind this. I think Thomas Kail did a great job as director of deciding when to use the wide shots of the stage and when to go close in. Obviously, film is a different thing than theatre because the camera tells you where to look, but I think he did a good job of balancing the entire stage picture and the moments where it was appropriate to go closer.
 
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Adam Lenhardt

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I actually don't mind this. I think Thomas Kail did a great job as director of deciding when to use the wide shots of the stage and when to go close in. Obviously, film is a different thing than theatre because the camera tells you where to look, but I think he did a good job of balancing the entire stage picture and the moments where it was appropriate to go closer.
And there's also a difference in the actors' performances. How they play scenes and moments when they know they're in a close-up is different than how they play scenes where they have to convey attitude or emotion to the back row of the balcony.

A version of this created only from the two live performances that were filmed would be not only a different perspective but also different performances than what we got here, and probably wouldn't play as well as it did with a live audience in the theater.

The thing that impressed me the most about Thomas Kail's approach to this was how successfully and seamlessly he weaved in and out between the live performances with stage acting and the stuff shot in between the live performances with the camera on stage with the actors engaged in screen acting. Walking that line was something he also did extremely effectively with FOX's live production of "Grease", for my money far and away the best of the bunch when it comes to the recent revival of live television musicals. He know what works with a live audience, and he knows what works for a television audience, and he knows how to translate the live audience experience for television audiences.
 
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Jake Lipson

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The thing that impressed me the most about Thomas Kail's approach to this was how successfully and seamlessly he weaved in and out between the live performances with stage acting and the stuff shot in between the live performances with the camera on stage with the actors engaged in screen acting.
Right. It felt completely seamless to me, in terms of I was not sitting there thinking about where the edits were. I was just inside the story of it. Even though I know it was edited together from a few days of work, it felt like a continuous performance,

How they play scenes and moments when they know they're in a close-up is different than how they play scenes where they have to convey attitude or emotion to the back row of the balcony.
To an extent, I am sure that's true because knowledge of the camera being in front of you is going to change the equation somewhat. But Kail has also said that he did not have any conversations with them about toning their work differently for the camera. Most everyone had been doing it for a year on Broadway up to that point (except for Jonathan Groff, who left earlier and came back for the filming), so I think they were comfortable enough in what they were doing to not change it drastically for the camera.

I love the album, and I understand the desire to record the album relatively early on in a show's run because the producers want to get it out in the world to be an ambassador for the show. But I'm glad this was filmed at the end of the run for the original cast, because I think they might be even better here than they are on the album, and that comes from the experience of having done the show longer and lived in it more by the point that they rolled the cameras as opposed to when they recorded the album.
 

Mike Frezon

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Peg and I watched the entire thing last night.

So as not to disappoint Mr. Manuel-Miranda--and not be perceived as a thread-crapper--I will simply say we didn't care for it. At all.

One positive thing I will say is that the production was well recorded. The quality (PQ and SQ) was terrific. And I thought the direction of the production was spot-on in terms of maintaining a theater-like quality with the addition of multiple camera angles and close-ups. If only more Broadway productions had this same type of preservation.
 
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Wayne_j

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I still haven't gotten around to watching this, but I did watch 1776 last night.
 

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