Guns of Navarone problem? Or am I crazy?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Gabe D, Aug 15, 2002.

  1. Gabe D

    Gabe D Cinematographer

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    I just watched the first hour of The Guns of Navarone and the picture didn't look quite right to me. I just checked some reviews and nobody mentioned it, so I'm starting to wonder if it's in my head.
    Here's the thing: it looks to me like the picture is stretched horizontally, so everybody is a little fat.
    Has anybody else noticed this? (I can't be the only one... can I?)
     
  2. Jan H

    Jan H Cinematographer

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    Hey, Gabe,

    I just watched it last week, and it looked fine to me. I have a Toshiba 65h80 and a Tosh 9200, and there were no problems at all, the picture looked great to me. Did your settings somehow get out of whack?
     
  3. Kelly W

    Kelly W Second Unit

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    If I'm not mistaken, the DVD is non-anamorphic widescreen.
    If I watch such a disc in "16:9 Enhanced Mode" on my TV, the picture looks just as you described. MAYBE, the setting on your TV is incorrect????
    I watched The Guns of Navarone on DVD a while back, and it looked fine. With 2600 posts, you're certainly no newbie, so forgive me if I'm stating the obvious. [​IMG]
    -Kelly
     
  4. TedD

    TedD Supporting Actor

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    It IS anamorphic widescreen.

    Ted
     
  5. Doug Bull

    Doug Bull Advanced Member

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    Yes it is indeed Anamorphic and the picture is perfect.

    It sounds as if your DVD player's settings are switched to either 4:3 or(4:3) Letterbox and you have your TV switched to 16:9.

    You need to reset your player's settings to 16:9 or Anamorphic (or whatever it is called on your player)

    I keep my player switched to 16:9 at all times,because with that setting everything, be it 4:3 or 16:9 comes out correctly.
    I only have to alter my TV Setting to 4:3 for 4;3 material and 16:9 for 16:9 material, as required.
     
  6. Gabe D

    Gabe D Cinematographer

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    Actually, it can't be settings. I was watching it on a portable player with a 16x9 display, so there are no separate settings for the player vs. the monitor. I should have pointed that out, because you guys drew the obvious conclusion.
    Also, what I'm talking about is more subtle than that. When you see a 4x3 picture stretched to 16x9 it's hard not to notice. What I noticed with Guns of Navarone was not that dramatic. I don't necessarily think it's a problem with the DVD. Maybe this movie has always looked like that. I just thought that Gregory Peck and David Niven looked a little bit wider than usual.
    Really, whether I find out the cause or not, I'd be happy if somebody else just said they noticed the same thing. [​IMG]
     
  7. Bill McCamy

    Bill McCamy Second Unit

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    "I just thought that Gregory Peck and David Niven looked a little bit wider than usual."


    Maybe it was all that great Greek food on location.
     
  8. Kelly W

    Kelly W Second Unit

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    Wow, thanks for the correction on the anamorphic enhancement, guys. I'd held off buying this disc because I was convinced it wasn't. (Maybe I'M the one who's crazy.) Oh, well. There's another disc to add to my "to buy" list. [​IMG]
    As for your problem, Gabe-- I don't know what could be going on. Have you had a chance to watch it on another display?
    -Kelly
     
  9. Michael Warner

    Michael Warner Supporting Actor

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    I believe it has something to do with the camera lens used. If you look closely at the early scene in which the plan is being explained to Gregory Peck's character you'll notice that the columns in the office are all warped a bit. Everything at the extreme edges of the frame suffers from this bowing effect which may explain the wide-looking people as well.
     
  10. Rain

    Rain Producer

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  11. Bill McCamy

    Bill McCamy Second Unit

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    So much for my theory about the cuisine of the Greek isles.
     
  12. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    CinemaScope films through a certain period were filmed either with prisms (Kwai) or imperfect optics.

    They gave the impression that actors in certain positions within the frame had the mumps, which was the basis of the term CinemaScope mumps.

    DP Freddie Young, who worked with the process in Hollywood before returning to England to photograph Knights of the Round Table described it thusly:

    One would break the screen down into five positions.

    The one thing that you would never, ever want to do is place your female lead in the center of the screen, as it would add many pounds to her face.

    Positions 2 and 4 looked normal, while 1 and 5 made things look narrower and as for position 3?

    You don't want to be there.

    All of this was finally corrected when the early Panavision optics arrived in the early 60s.

    RAH
     
  13. Rob Tomlin

    Rob Tomlin Producer

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    Yep, I always see a slight distortion in image with the early CinemaScope movies. Thank God for Panavision!
     
  14. Gabe D

    Gabe D Cinematographer

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    Thanks for all the info, guys. Good to know my eyes aren't playing tricks on me.
     
  15. Paul W

    Paul W Second Unit

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    Was Mad mad mad ... mad world shot in Cinemascope? I remember watching it on TV recently (TCM?) and in some scenes, the people would get fat, skinny, fat, skinny as they walked across the screeen. Wierd![​IMG]
     

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