grouchy email from people at work

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Philip_G, Mar 13, 2003.

  1. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    what would you do? reply and tell them you don't appriciate the tone? or just ignore it?
    I asked for help with something and get a response from someone fairly high up basically lecturing me for not doing what I asked for help on. WTF?
    so I'm torn...
     
  2. Travis Olson

    Travis Olson Supporting Actor

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    Travis Olson
    I'd forget about it. There's nothing worse then working with people who are either mad at you or don't like you. At jobs I've had if someone, even management, doesn't like they way I did something, tough. I won't try to argue or stir the pot over it because it's just a job.
     
  3. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    it's just getting old. Every time I ask for help I get bitched at, so i'm just not going to do it anymore. screw 'em I guess.
     
  4. Edwin-S

    Edwin-S Producer
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    it's just getting old. Every time I ask for help I get bitched at, so i'm just not going to do it anymore. screw 'em I guess.
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    They just get pissed off because you keep reminding them that they know less about it than you do. [​IMG]
     
  5. Bill_D

    Bill_D Supporting Actor

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    I have had people at work "who want what they want" despite another functional area's procedures which are tied to something called a performance review which equates to money. So when these people send nasties and want to copy the world, I immediately respond professionally and distinctly with appropriate tone and route to take to solve their problem because they are messin' with my money.
     
  6. Kirk Gunn

    Kirk Gunn Screenwriter

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    I would NOT respond via e-mail. A lot of people, including high-level supervisors, do not feel writing a tactful e-mail is of high priority and they easily offend. A gut-response could make you seem belligerent.

    Difficult to judge without detailed info of your job, but I would approach your immediate supervisor verbally and ask for his advice on who you should approach. Ensure you explain the options you've already researched and why the suggestions in the previous message won't work.

    But don't talk to your boss without being able to disprove every point in that e-mail !

    Another point to remember: The most valuable employees are the most resourceful, because they need less supervision. They take time to research problems and come up with their own solutions, even if they think "out of the box". If a co-worker (even one you don't know in another department) has worked on a similar issue, inquire verbally from them. It provides a good chance to meet other people and spread your good name around.
     
  7. MarcVH

    MarcVH Second Unit

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    Did you get that memo about the TPS reports? [​IMG]

    I'm sure that you're not one of them, but there are some people who "ask for help" from co-workers in a way that makes it clear that some or all of the following apply:
    • They're in over their head, and are not qualified to perform the job they hold
    • They've been told repeatedly what they need to know, but didn't bother to remember it
    • They're trying to get other people to do their job for them

    Since e-mail lacks context, the fact that you're not doing any of those things may not be obvious to the reader just because it's obvious to you. So try to not look like that.

    That said, the response depends on the person and the position. If it's your boss, or your boss's boss, you can't really afford to ignore it. If it's just a random co-worker with a chip on his shoulder, you may be able to.

    A lot of people who are boorish jerks in e-mail become much less confrontational in person, where the social cues are different. So I tend to agree with the notion of not replying via e-mail.
     
  8. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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