Great article on music licensing!

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by Gord Lacey, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. Gord Lacey

    Gord Lacey Cinematographer

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  2. todd s

    todd s Lead Actor

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    Interesting article. You have to wonder what half dozen shows were passed over. I wonder if their is anyway of having a large conference and try to hammer something out. I know their can be 1000's of music owners. But, if they can work out deals with the larger owners it might help. And those older song holders who hold out for big money are missing a big opportunity to introduce your music to new listeners and potential new buyers.
     
  3. Ethan Riley

    Ethan Riley Producer

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    Well this article answered a lot of my questions; (seeing as how my other "music rights" thread was smugly deflated). I like the last paragraph where they mention the higher cost of retaining the original music sometimes. You know what though: I don't really care paying a little more for some shows; the American Dreams dvd was well worth the asking price.
     
  4. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    No one even suggested this aspect before.

    And with unbastardized British R2 DVDs of shows bastardized in R1 (Quantum Leap, The Muppet Show), I can see where this is headed. No one has ever suggested the regulation of a standard mechanical fee for video, but I think it needs to be done now.
     
  5. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    This is more than a bit of a red herring. While there are standardized mechanical rates for audio only releases, that doesn't mean that anyone can just go out and publish albums with an artist's recordings included, there are negotiated licenses involved, which can cost whatever the publisher/artist wants and can get. The mechanicals are only a part of the deal.

    The bottom line is that producers looking to add the value a piece of music can bring have to pay for it. In the case of movies and TV, if the rights aren't negotiated ahead of time for video release, then there will be negotiations required, and costs incurred in order to get that license.
     
  6. Jeffrey Nelson

    Jeffrey Nelson Screenwriter

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    Apparently not true in the case of poor BILLION DOLLAR BRAIN, which had The Beatles snipped out of it.
     
  7. Ravi K

    Ravi K Supporting Actor

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    Will the current situation of renegotiating music rights for DVD lead to TV producers clearing these rights from the start instead of just clearing music for initial telecast? Do the TV music clearances usually include syndication broadcast?
     
  8. MattHR

    MattHR Screenwriter

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    There are many examples of films that have music alterations/substitutions for their video release. A few that come to mind:

    WAYNE'S WORLD, THE BREAKFAST CLUB*, WEIRD SCIENCE*, NIGHTHAWKS, SIXTEEN CANDLES*, TRADING PLACES*.

    (*These titles had the original music restored for their current DVD editions.)
     

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