Got My SVS 20-39 Today!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brent_Sch, Mar 13, 2002.

  1. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I got my first taste of SVS today and am amazed. I bought a 20-39CS used for 3 months from a HTF member for extremeley cheap and couldn't be happier. I'm 17 and have pretty much bought all my HT stuff with my own money, except for the receiver I got for Christmas and the old receiver of my dad's powering the SVS. This certainly beats the budget DLS 10" I was using from partsexpress.com.
    I'm happy with this thing being pushed by 65 watts of an Onkyo so I can't imagine the sound from an SVS driven by an amp with triple digit watts!
    Tomorrow I plan on utilizing an empty house to push the sub to some heights of bass never experienced before in this house!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Thomas F

    Thomas F Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2001
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Suggestion: With only 65 watts, you want to avoid sending a clipped signal to the sub. Doing so could damage the driver. If you hear any distortion, you may want to back down on the gain a little.
     
  3. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Not exactly sure what you mean. Can you explain a little?
    Thanks! [​IMG]
     
  4. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2001
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Most people don't realize it's more dangerous to have too little power than it is to have too much power.

    The signals sent to the amp are usualing in nice wave patterns that always keep the cone moving. However, if the wave has an amplitude that goes past the power the amp can put out, the amp will clip the signal. What this means is that instead of a nice smooth curve that always keeps the cone moving, the peak of the curve will become a flat spot. This flat spot means the cone is held still. If the cone is held still the voice coils will be toasted very quickly. You will get almost no warning that clipping is about to occur.

    On the other hand, applying too much power can provide lots of warning. Well unless you crank the system before you start the source, then it will be possible to blow a driver with too much power. But as long as you don't do something silly like that and start low and turn it up after the source starts you will be provided with lots of warning. Drivers have a linear limit to there motion and a mechanical limit. Once they pass their linear limit they start to sound really bad. This means it's time to back off. To damage them with too much power you have to take them past their mechanical limit. It will sound god aweful before you reach the mechanical limit.
     
  5. SVS-Ron

    SVS-Ron Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2001
    Messages:
    1,074
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Dustin,

    Great explanation. Thanks for that!

    Brent, the practical implications are that you should take things easy at first. If you haven't already, beg, borrow or steal the funds needed to get a Radio Shack sound meter. For under $40 it's by far the most important investment you can make in your young HT career.

    Learn to use that with a test disk like Video Essentials or Avia (I think you can rent them at Net Flix) and you can use that receiver to power your sub for years.

    Crank Phantom Menace to +10dB over reference level (the CS manual explains more on that) and run things up nice and loud with the 'rents out of the house and you'll be asking us eventually how much a new driver costs.

    Square waves are a bad thing as Dustin so well explained. With 65 watts you just need to pay close attention to how the receiver behaves and the sub sounds. Excessive heat on the receiver is a bad sign, "bottoming" or distortion from the sub (yes, a massively clipped signal can bottom a CS sub with 65 watts) and you need to back off your calibrated level. Which is why the sound meter is so important. Without it you have no idea where you are set to start with. Sort of like filling your car tires "by feel". You can get away with that for a while, sooner or later you'll regret it though.

    Ron
     
  6. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So as long as I'm not bottoming out the sub (I wold definately notice this right?) and the receiver isn't over-heating there is no need to worry right? I definately plan on purhasing the SPL meter in the near future to help with this stuff.

    One other thing, bottoming out the sub seems like it could happen when played excessively loud in my situation right?

    Thanks for all the replies everybody!
     
  7. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Question. I was playing my SVS pretty loud today for U-571 and all of sudden the bass just stopped during the depth charge scene. I was playing it louder than I usually ever would while watching a movie but was just having too much fun with my new SVS and hearing it rumble loud and proud!

    What did I do? I couldn't get it going again right away so I powered everything down and was going to let things cool off before I go back. Is this the old Stereo Receiver's problem or did I do something to my sub? Please help anybody!

    Thanks
     
  8. DwightK

    DwightK Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2000
    Messages:
    269
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Receiver. I could do the same thing when I was using an old 2 channel receiver. You will notice the same effect on any of the monster bass movies like TS2, JP3, jarjar, etc.

    Not happening with the AVA250 amp.
     
  9. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It's been almost 2 hours now and I still can't get it to play anything. Any suggestions?

    One other thing, when you used a stereo receiver, did you hear a hum noise whenever you turned on the stereo receiver? I do and figured it was normal but I want to check that and make sure it is.

    Thanks for helping!
     
  10. DwightK

    DwightK Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2000
    Messages:
    269
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Never heard a humm noise but from other posts around here that is a ground loop humm.
    I read somewhere around here that a HTFer wasted his old receiver powering an SVS and bought a Sampson. I only ever clipped my receiver which was that total drop in volume but it only ever lasted about a second and then woofin started again.
    You only had one RCA going from your main receiver to one input (CD) on the old receiver right? i.e. only the red one and not the other? Was balance shifted to the one channel? Did you have the sub receivers volume maxed? Is that old Onkyo designed to handle a 4 ohm load?
    It might be that you ate that Onkyo[​IMG]
     
  11. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,798
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    Real Name:
    Jeff Lam
    Brent,

    Try plugging in a cd player to an input on the receiver and power it up with a speaker attached to the output... Anything? Most likely you blew a fuse in the receiver or it went into shutdown mode. Does the receiver even turn on?
     
  12. SVS-Ron

    SVS-Ron Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2001
    Messages:
    1,074
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Brent,

    I suppose it's too late to re-read my post above ;^)??

    As Tom wrote to you in e-mail, IF the receiver turns on, you might be able to just try another channel of the receiver. If you used CD input, say right channel, use the left now.

    If the receiver won't come on then look for a fuse (make DAMN sure the receiver is unplugged, and we don not recommend you go poking around inside at all).

    If you are lucky you only popped a fuse.

    If you are NOT lucky you should start looking for another amp (VERY inexpensive plate amps at Parts Express.com you can build a small box for) and hope that no damage to the driver was done when the receiver died.

    Don't forget to get that sound meter. It could have saved you here.

    Ron
     
  13. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I tried another channel and everyting and every other speaker I hooked to it played just fine.
    I even took my DLS partsexpress.com subwoofer and took the amp from the back of it to try and power the SVS but no luck. I've been working with Tom V. as well so hopefully we'll get something to go right or find some fix.
    Tom V. suggested the Onkyo was really clipping into the sub but doesn't it seem like I should have noticed that? Again, remember I'm new!
    Thanks to all for all the help and suggestions.
    Wish me luck! [​IMG]
     
  14. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2002
    Messages:
    1,370
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've seen something like this that has happened that might have happened to your subwoofer and that is press in slightly on the cone as the sub might of popped and stuck out in the forward position when the Onkyo clipped (I'd advise do this gently, as this happened to a friend of mine's Citation 7.4 subwoofer and this was all the fix it took and sub didn't seem hurt and still works to this day). Hopefully you didn't burn the VC. Good luck and hope this helps.
     
  15. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  16. Peter Johnson

    Peter Johnson Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2000
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  17. Robert Ma

    Robert Ma Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2001
    Messages:
    368
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Are you sure you didn't change your receivers speaker setup for the subwoofer?

    I wish I had a dime every time someone thought their sub was dead and it was turned off on the receivers config...

    Bob
     
  18. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Just checked all the saettings on my HT receiver and they did not change. They are set to how the should be but thanks for the suggestion! Anything will be considered at this point!

    Thanks
     
  19. Massimo N

    Massimo N Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2000
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Brent,

    First, double check all of your connections and your main receiver's configuration. If they all appear correct, it is very possible that you fried your receiver. Try hooking up another speaker to your receiver (the one powering the SVS) to verify that it's the receiver.
     
  20. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The receiver for the SVS works just fine. I tested it as you and others have mentioned. I'm worried that maybe I have blown the "sub-out" connection on my main HT receiver now. I can get the radio to play through the sub via the old stereo receiver but nothing in music of my own or movies using the HT receiver. Going to try some more things first to test the HT receiver but hopefully something will be successful or at least I'll be able to come up with the problem.

    Thanks for the help.
     

Share This Page