Gorilla Glue?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Greg Yeatts, Apr 18, 2003.

  1. Greg Yeatts

    Greg Yeatts Second Unit

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    I am using Gorilla Glue on my Tumult enclosure. When I get a little glue squeeze-out on the inside of the enclosure, this stuff is really hard to get off. If I don't remove the squeeze-out, it would be difficult to impossible to seal the box with silicone. OTOH, the box seems pretty well sealed by the squeeze-out. Would the squeeze-out from the Gorilla Glue seal the enclosure?
     
  2. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    Yea, it should seal the enclosure, as long as you have squeeze out the entire length of a seam.

    Pete
     
  3. Greg Yeatts

    Greg Yeatts Second Unit

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    Pete

    I was really surprised how uniform the squeeze-out was. Gorrila Glue is superior to the other polyurethane glues that I have used.
     
  4. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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    I have found with Gorilla glue it is A LOT easier to remove the excess if you just let it expand. Do not try to wipe it off while it is wet. Do not even touch it. Let it foam up and harden over night. Then the excess will come off pretty easily. Use a sharp wood chisel and lightly scrape down the seam.

    As was stated, if you got good squeeze-out the entire length of the joint, then your joint IS sealed. No need for caulk.


    Ronnie
     
  5. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Question: Why use polyuerthane glue? It's very expensive and does not make a stronger wood joint than PVA glue ("carpenters' glue"). I've built a slew of speaker cabinets, from Bose-size to 7-ft monster towers and have always used Titebond or Elemers. The poly's have their place in gluing joints that are not a prefect fit - they are great at filling gaps since they expand on curing.
    My two Hz worth.
     
  6. BrianJ>Y

    BrianJ>Y Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi guys,

    I'm about to glue and screw my sub together this weekend and have some questions about what glue to use. My concern is that a couple of my mdf pieces are not completely flat, none of the pieces at my local HD or Lowes were perfect cuts, so should I use these polyurethane glues that expand rather than plain carpenter's?
     
  7. Greg Yeatts

    Greg Yeatts Second Unit

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    Hank

    I use it because all of my panels are laminates of either two or three sheets of .75" mdf. In the lamination process some yellow glue got on the surfaces to be glued. I tried cleaning the glue off of the open pore portion of the mdf with a moist towel. The glue still sealed the pores. I thought that this may make using the yellow glue a gamble. Poly glue is a natural for this type of situation. Normally I'm a Titebond II type of guy. Poly does have its place.
     
  8. Darren_T

    Darren_T Second Unit

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    I agree that using Poly is probably a bad idea. Not only is it expensive but it is elastic meaning the joints aren't ever "solid". They will expand and contract with vibration which equals resonance. Yellow glue forms a bond stonger than the material itself. If you have cuts that aren't right then cut new panels.

    Darren
     
  9. Greg Yeatts

    Greg Yeatts Second Unit

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    Darren

    I built a 21.5" cube with 1.5" ndf for my current sub using poly glue. When taking the cabinet up some staire (brick stairs mind you) the strap on the hand truck broke and the cabinet rolled down about 7 stairs. Other than some slight cosmetic damage, the cabinet was fine. No apparent leaks. Now this enclosure is very heavy. I would have expected it to break apart. I think poly glue is definitely strong enough.
     
  10. Darren_T

    Darren_T Second Unit

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    I never said poly wasn't strong. Actually the same would have occurred with yellow glue. Any well built enclosure would have survived this incident. It is my opinion that poly glue is not the right glue for enclosures. Just as liquid nails isn't. Yellow glue was made for this purpose, it's been used by woodworkers for many many years. It's just my opinion, I'm not saying your enclosure is in any way bad. I'm just speaking from 20+ years of furniture building that poly glue is elastic and will be more resonant than yellow glue which is non-elastic and becomes part of the wood bond.

    Darren
     
  11. Greg Yeatts

    Greg Yeatts Second Unit

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    Darren

    I like PVA glues as much as you do. However, I did get some glue on the joints to be glued together when I was laminating the panels. I thought since these areas are not as porous as they once were, the Gorilla Glue may be a better choice. Was this folly? I'm really not trying to pick at you, I want your advice.
     
  12. Darren_T

    Darren_T Second Unit

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    Hey, I'm not bothered by a little discussion [​IMG] For a subwoofer I think your choice was just fine since you probably wouldn't ever notice any resonance if there was any. As for your situation with the glue sealing the pores, if you can't get all the glue with water then I usually take a little sand paper to it after it dries. The yellow glues will generally sand off pretty easily since they harden well. You can also take a scraper to it which works well too. Another thing is taking a wet towel to the dry glue and an iron. You can iron the wet towel over the glue and it will re-activate it to a small degree, then you can usually add more yellow glue to that and it will bond well. If it was just a little glue slop here and there then I wouldn't worry about it at all, I'd just be sure it was sanded flat and glue it up.

    Just some advice people can take or leave below [​IMG]

    The most important thing with building speaker cabinets is to get the cuts as perfect as you possibly can up front. Dry fit everything to be sure the fit is as intended before gluing it up. This will save a few headaches...don't get anxious, take your time and check everything! [​IMG] Don't use clamping pressure to compensate for a poor joint, MDF is cheap, make another panel if your cut is less than acceptable. Clamping harder to squeeze a bad joint together starves the joint of glue setting you up for a joint failure in the future. Don't get hung up with fancy jointwork. Simple butt joints with yellow glue will be very strong. Rabbet joints for braces are a good "upgrade" if you are feeling up to it, otherwise the simple butt joint that fits properly is more than enough. Keep it simple and take your time!

    Ok, that's enough of Darren and his unsolicited advice [​IMG] Hope it helps a few people.

    Darren
     
  13. Greg Yeatts

    Greg Yeatts Second Unit

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    I was amazingly pleased with my panel fits. I have a local lumberyard do all of my panel cutting for me. I don't have a table saw. I hope to get one soon.

    I originally got into diy speakerbuilding to save money. Now that I see all of the speakers I am building and the tools I have purchased, can't say I have saved much. But the satisfaction is great.
     
  14. Darren_T

    Darren_T Second Unit

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    You may not have saved much due to the buying of "Toys" [​IMG] but you now have an excuse to acquire more TOOLS! The only thing I enjoy as much or maybe even more than woodworking is acquiring new tools. The satisfaction is great too isn't it? If you find you really enjoy the woodworking part of it you should definately invest in a good contractor style table saw. You'd be amazed at the quality you can achieve. It might be a bit of overkill though if you don't intend to do much woodworking.

    Let me know if you decide to take it on as a hobby. I can hook you up with some discussion forums for good advice on tools etc. I can also give you my opinion.

    Darren
     

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