good setup suggestions

Discussion in 'Displays' started by brett GR, Aug 25, 2004.

  1. brett GR

    brett GR Auditioning

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    i am currantly building a 20 x 20 family room and i am looking for a good tv and surround system for between 3000 and $4000. any suggestions for a good setup. i was thinking of a rptv and a sound system that i am going to wire in the walls before i install the drywall.

    thanks for your help
    brett
     
  2. Tony Mc

    Tony Mc Stunt Coordinator

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    If I were you, I'd do some research on front projection. As long as you have some light control, you'd be amazed at the picture quality. I was going to get a 60" Hitachi RPTV and then I did some research on front projectors and I was intrigued. I have light control and a 96" diagonal and alot better then 60". The Olympics and sports in general in HDTV on a large screen is the best. I'm glad I made the choice for front projection instead of RPTV. And my room dimensions are:
    projector is 11 feet from the screen and seating is 12-13 feet from the screen. My costs were: $1800 for projector, $600 for screen (can be DIY or less expensive models can be had), I already had the surround system (approx $800).
     
  3. John S

    John S Producer

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    Bret, RPTV is so broad these days.
    Do you know of a technology you prefer at least?

    I'm going to assume you want DLP RPTV perhaps?

    It being a family room, not a more deidcated HT room, I tend to still agree on the RPTV choice. of yours. But you need to try to figure out what technology including front projection you would tend to lean towards for your tastes and use characteristics.

    On the large side of things, you can these days get into one of the rediculously large 73" Mitsubishi sets for around $3000 to $3500. I think it's the gold series WS73513, this is good ol CRT RPTV which I seem to still prefer myself. This would be the largest RPTV in your budget.

    Do you have an idea of what screen size you would like to have? I'd probably get the Mitsu myself with that budget, I 'd squeeze in the surround sound somehow.

    I use a 60" by the way if your curious, only paid $1248 delivered for it late last fall.
     
  4. brett GR

    brett GR Auditioning

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    my wife says front projection is out. i'm thinking of 60-65in rptv. i don't know much about the diffences in them, that is why i am asking for some suggestions. i am looking for the best picture and sound i can get, but i also know some rptv's if you don't sit directly in front of it the picture is dark. i am looking for a comprimes of price and quality and looking for some more knowledgeable opinions then mine.

    once again thanks for the help.
     
  5. John S

    John S Producer

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    Nearly all rear projection HDTV's only allow a certain amount of horizontal off axis seating. Mine is good to about 8' off axis fromt he center of the screen at about 10' to 11'.... Vertical off axis is the pits on most all of them.

    Aside from good ol CRT RPTV, A newer technology called DLP, has become very popular.

    The Pannasonic PT-60DL14 and Samsung HLN617W are two such examples. They do seem to have better horizontle off axis performance than CRT RPTV generally does, the vertical off axis still stinks. (in other words stand up and the picture degrades badly)
     
  6. Matthew Todd

    Matthew Todd Second Unit

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    The reason for this is that the CRTs used in CRT RPTVs (probably what you were thinking of) are not very bright. They use a high gain screen to boost the brightness directly in front of the screen, which makes it dark off axis (especially vertical but also horizontal).

    The new types of RPTVs (DLP, LCD, and LCOS) are generally brighter projection technologies than CRT. Because of this, they may not all use a high gain screen to boost brightness. If they use a lower gain screen, it will be more uniform brightness all around, whether you are directly in front of the screen, standing up, or off to the side. You might check out the DLPs and LCDs to see if this is the case.

    The DLPs and LCDs do have disadvantages too. They are more expensive, DLPs can show rainbows (not everyone is sensitive), both may show screendoor effect (more on LCD), and neither is going to be capable of super dark blacks.

    Matt
     

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