Good news from Apple about older iPhone battery life and iOS slow down

Ted Todorov

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That data is from 5 years ago.

My wife's Motorola Android phone is five years old and still working on it's original battery. I just upgraded from my 3+ year old Motorola phone to a new Samsung Galaxy as part of a switch from Verizon to Sprint. It's original battery still got me through the day without charging.
What Benedict Evans (who is at Andreessen Horowitz) is saying is about Android phones as whole - not high end ones like Galaxys - Android has 80%+ of the world market overwhelmingly with cheap, usually phones that do not even get distributed in the US. His article may be 5 years old, but judging from what he says on Tweeter and the a16z podcast nothing has changed in the average lifetime of Android phones today.

Nobody is arguing that all Android phones were dead after 9 months, just as I'm not arguing that my 2007 iPhone (which lasted until 2 years ago) or iPhone 4 which is still our "iPod Touch" somehow have invincible batteries or other people use them for 8 years. Just that the difference between iOS vs Android is based on the average iPhone vs. the average Android phones: in other words Google doesn't develop Android for just high end Pixel phones (which make up less than 1% of the market, in other words, essentially don't exist), Android is for *all* Android phones.

To put yet another way - iOS is exclusively for high end phones, which, on the average, get used for 3+ years. Android is for Android phones, which are overwhelmingly low end, and get used, on the average, for 9 months.
 

Scott Merryfield

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What Benedict Evans (who is at Andreessen Horowitz) is saying is about Android phones as whole - not high end ones like Galaxys - Android has 80%+ of the world market overwhelmingly with cheap, usually phones that do not even get distributed in the US. His article may be 5 years old, but judging from what he says on Tweeter and the a16z podcast nothing has changed in the average lifetime of Android phones today.

Nobody is arguing that all Android phones were dead after 9 months, just as I'm not arguing that my 2007 iPhone (which lasted until 2 years ago) or iPhone 4 which is still our "iPod Touch" somehow have invincible batteries or other people use them for 8 years. Just that the difference between iOS vs Android is based on the average iPhone vs. the average Android phones: in other words Google doesn't develop Android for just high end Pixel phones (which make up less than 1% of the market, in other words, essentially don't exist), Android is for *all* Android phones.

To put yet another way - iOS is exclusively for high end phones, which, on the average, get used for 3+ years. Android is for Android phones, which are overwhelmingly low end, and get used, on the average, for 9 months.
I have no idea who Benedict Evans is, but using 5 year old data to make any point regarding smart phones is ridiculous. It's like using data from the 1980's regarding automotive reliability to make a point about today's cars.
 

Ted Todorov

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I have no idea who Benedict Evans is, but using 5 year old data to make any point regarding smart phones is ridiculous. It's like using data from the 1980's regarding automotive reliability to make a point about today's cars.
His firm doesn't release their current data to the public. They obviously do have it though - if they did things based on 5 years old data, they'd be out of business.
 

Scott Merryfield

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His firm doesn't release their current data to the public. They obviously do have it though - if they did things based on 5 years old data, they'd be out of business.
Thanks for that info. As I said, I had no idea who Benedict Evans was, but the five year old data issue in the context of the linked article just stood out like a sore thumb to me.
 

RobertR

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Nobody is arguing that all Android phones were dead after 9 months
Then you and Evans shouldn't have used the word "last" instead of "used". Very different connotation. You also implied that so-called "low end" phones don't "last", with zero evidence to support it.
 
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zoetmb

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I have a friend with an iPhone 6, and he tells me the performance degradations are profound for him. The pop-up letters on the keyboard taking up to 5 seconds to appear when typing.

He's looking into the iFixit $29 DIY kit rather than waiting a couple months for Apple.

I just messaged him this to try:
http://mglenn.com/blog/2017/12/22/apples-bungled-battery-feature

His slowdown is probably not related to the battery slowdown and is more likely to be that he has too many apps or files on the device.
 

zubinell

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I was kind of surprised by the news I just saw about Apple apologizing about the battery wear and the iOS slow down to compensate for an older battery. I’m not surprised they apologized and got in front of it before it got more out of hand as a PR issue.

What did surprise me is a new battery replacement program as they consider it a consumable. It was the right thing to do.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/28...e-battery-replacement-price-slow-down-apology

I have an iPhone 6 that I was considering replacing the battery so this is perfect for $29.00 even though I use the iPhone X now, it will become a possible phone for my parents.
Nelson
Don't kid yourself. Actually, I am stunned to hear you say it. You said " I’m not surprised they apologized and got in front of it before it got more out of hand as a PR issue."
Apple had no ambition to GET OUT IN FRONT of it BEFORE it became a PR issue. it is a PR issue. The only reason they decided to do anything at all is because of the $999 BILLION dollar law suit. Yes with a B.
http://www.konbini.com/us/lifestyle/apple-999-billion-lawsuit-slowing-down-iphones/
Do You really think they would "Take care of you" because they are pleasant people. Consider the potential impact of a $999 billion law suit might have to a $900 billion dollar company. It is not just you and me. They are facing massive fraud lawsuits in every country on the globe.
it is business - Big business and they are not looking to be your friend. Easily evident by the way they lied about it so far. They care about nothing other than your money.
http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-battery-controversy-10-billion-lost-iphone-sales-2018-1
So look at what happens here - they create a massive conspiracy to defraud one of the largest consumer groups in the world and then when they are caught and recognize the gravity of their crime they say "We are sorry - here is a token to try and escape the truth" and people like you say "They Apologized and got out in front ..... it was the right thing to do" not good enough - it was a crime.
There are none so blind as those who will not see -
 

TJPC

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Does anyone make a sensible smart phone with a battery slot in the side where you can simply slide in a new battery where needed?! This corporate greed which forces you to buy a new phone every few years when the battery dies is ridiculous.

I remember old jokes from the ‘50s about having to buy a new car because the ash tray was full.

While we are at it, how about slide in memory chips that you can replace when full, and put back when you want to access the information on them?
 

RobertR

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Does anyone make a sensible smart phone with a battery slot in the side where you can simply slide in a new battery where needed?!
User replaceable batteries were commonplace among Android phones until a few years ago, when it was decided to follow Apple's lead and no longer provide them.
This corporate greed which forces you to buy a new phone every few years when the battery dies is ridiculous.
Agreed.

While we are at it, how about slide in memory chips that you can replace when full, and put back when you want to access the information on them?
That's exactly what my phone has. It's called a micro SD card. It's a hell of a lot cheaper than the Apple approach, which disdains them.
 

Mike Frezon

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That's exactly what my phone has. It's called a micro SD card. It's a hell of a lot cheaper than the Apple approach, which disdains them.
I'd love to be able to eject a memory card to offload photos from my phone (iPhone 6) to laptop & external HDDs. It's not a major PITA to connect my entire phone to the laptop to offload pix, but I'd personally find it to be easier to do it from a card.
 

Mike Frezon

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I'm watching this development about the battery replacement with interest as I still have an iPhone 6. But my phone is new out-of-the-box from just a few months ago so I doubt it'll really help me. But my wife's iPhone 6 will DEFINITELY be taking advantage of this situation (although she's also got volume issues plaguing her phone and it may need to be replaced anyway).
 

Scott Merryfield

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While we are at it, how about slide in memory chips that you can replace when full, and put back when you want to access the information on them?
My Samsung Galaxy S8 has a slot for a microSD card. However, since I am currently only using 19GB of the phone's 64GB of storage, I have not bothered installing a card. I have to take the phone out of its Otterbox case in order to insert a card. Unless I run low on storage, I will not be installing a card.
 

Nelson Au

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I am not here to defend Apple or criticize them either, I’m not naive but I am a fan of Apple and use many of their products and with good results and am satisfied with them as useful tools. I am an industrial designer and when I can, I use their products for my work. But for other main tasks I use a PC too.

I know that Apple is a business and as such, they need to make a profit and they’ve done that very well since the return of Steve Jobs those many years ago and he set the course the company is on now.

So when I said it was good they got in front of the battery news, I meant it in a straight forward way. The news was getting bad and people were unhappy, so they took the steps necessary to settle the problem. They can’t have that negative PR continue. That’s not good for business. Plus they’ve built up a lot of good will and they can’t jeopardize that.

Personally, I think they did the right thing. I also don’t think personally, that they are an evil engine of profit whose sole purpose is to squeeze every dollar and profit from its users and customers. That’s not the Apple I think I know, again I’m not naive and will admit I don’t know all the thinking that goes on inside the Apple Campus. Sure they hide a lot of cash overseas to shelter it. And I know every accessory and connector adaptor is expensive. If Tim Cook is who I think he is, he’s more then about profits.

Regarding why batteries are not replaceable, this is an old argument. There’s a lot of reasons Apple gave and I cannot recall them all. One is that they have enough cycles to last the life of the product before upgrade time. Who wants to carry a spare battery? It would be nice though to have that ability to swap a battery out. As I said I am one of those industrial designers too working in Silicon Valley, so I get the argument too as the product is cleaner and simpler without the battery access adding more lines and clutter to the Design. Usually the Design team likes this, but it’s not always up to the Design team. The upper management might make that call. Probably Jobs was convinced by Jony Ives and or the engineering teams felt it was a doable thing too and they all went for it.

https://www.fastcompany.com/1293850/whats-deal-apples-non-removable-batteries

My iPhone 6 has lasted me three full years of use and the battery has weakened in that time. But it held up long enough to get me to the iPhone X. If I can I’ll probably replace the battery on the 6 for my parents to use as an emergency phone.

That about all I have to say about it. :)
 
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RobertR

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I also don’t think personally, that they are an evil engine of profit whose sole purpose is to squeeze every dollar and profit from its users
Yes, I'm sure it's PURE coincidence that their profit margins are so much higher (a fact which some Apple USERS, not STOCKHOLDERS, glorify) than everyone else's.

There’s a lot of reasons Apple gave and I cannot recall them all. One is that they have enough cycles to last the life of the product before upgrade time.
If the batteries have enough cycles to last before upgrade, then why is Apple offering to replace them? Their actions clearly contradict what you're saying. I also find it interesting that you seem to support the whole "battery problems? Pshaw! Just upgrade!" attitude that pissed off so many people and made people suspect that was the real motivation for the problems.

Who wants to carry a spare battery?
A lot of people liked that idea. Apple, of course, didn't.
 

TJPC

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What about a phone that could last 10 years? We have a Windows 10 computer in our main office. In the “man” cave however, I am still running my Windows XP which performs satisfactorily for almost every task. We were going to replace it as well, but made the decision to run it until we have to junk it. So far, I am still surfing the net, sending e-mail and burning discs as I always have.

The only problem we have had is with outside companies no longer making themselves compatible. For instance, my iPhone 5, which I keep as an iPod, still can sinc with iTunes, my new iPhone does not. This is basically a corporate decision. My wife had no trouble adapting from Windows XP to 10. As far as operations, they are really not that different.
 

Mark Booth

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Apple's reasons for the need of this "advanced power management" feature introduced with iOS 10.3.2 (for iPhone 6 and 6s) is that, without it, iPhone's might experience "unexpected shutdowns". Yet, the only references I can find to such a problem are similar to these two:

https://www.apple.com/support/iphone6s-unexpectedshutdown/

https://discussions.apple.com/thread/8023425

The first one is for the 6s only and is due to a BAD battery from the get-go. It has NOTHING to do with battery degradation.

The second one is with iOS 10.3.3 so it is AFTER Apple implemented the advanced power management features.

I am unable to find any posts making reference to "unexpected shutdowns" for iPhone 6 or 6s models that are strictly due to battery degradation.

It seems to me that the "unexpected shutdown" excuse is a red herring. Something to scare folks into believing Apple.

Maybe there's contrary information out there but, thanks to the popularity of this subject on the web right now, Google isn't returning the hits I'm looking for.

I've owned 7 different iPhone models. I've NEVER had an "unexpected shutdown" on any of them. Not even the ones with batteries that had degraded so far that they were not holding a charge for much more than half the day. The only time they "shutdown" was when the battery completely died and there was nothing unexpected about it.

Mark
 

DaveF

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KeithAP

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Apparently Apple has extended the battery-performance management to the iPhone 8, 8+ and X in iOS 12.1. From the release notes…
Adds a performance management feature to prevent the device from unexpectedly shutting down, including the option to disable this feature if an unexpected shutdown occurs, for iPhone X, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus.
I am too lazy to do a search but I thought Apple indicated, when this originally came to light, that those models wouldn't require such management? (could be wrong about that)

-KeithP
 
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