Good CD tweaks for dirty discs?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Royster, Jul 17, 2002.

  1. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    A lot of my favorite CDs from years ago is scratched terribly from being out of their sleeves and in my car. Any realistic CD cleaners out there that can buff out most of the fine scratches. I really would spend a hundred bucks if such a GOOD cleaner worked.
    Would any other tweaks help other than cleaning? I can hear my CDP mistracking on very quiet passages on said discs. Maybe a stabalizer on the disc as well as a cleaning?
    So in otherwords - what to do with beloved music that is damaged?
    thanks in advance,
    John
    -edit- MAN, talk about poor grammar. I'll just leave it this way to show my REAL IQ. [​IMG]
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Well John, this is the product I've used. My rationale behind its choice is largely due to my belief in 3M as a company that has enormous experience in the area of abrasives and cleaning products. Some of my kid's friends I believe use the diskwasher products for their computer games. Unless your scratches are deep and go down to where the data is, I don't see why they wouldn't be effective. In a pinch I've used toothpaste too. Didn't have any troubles with that and my CD's no longer have issues with tartar buildup either [​IMG]
    After you salvage them, it might be worth considering making a copy using a burner.
     
  3. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    Thanks Chu,

    I'd like to make perfect backups of every disc I own. Just am unsure of the quality. I've copied my CDs before but they didn't sound too good at all. pretty crappy really.
     
  4. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    not sure but i think audio/visible sources is the place to post for questions on copying. I've also found this link particularly informative.
     
  5. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    Ya, I've read most of the info on that site. Still looking for a known well and good method to backup CDs bit for bit.
    Speaking of double blind tests Chu...while this is for sure not on topic I thought I'd clue you into a little bit of sensory testing I'm exposed to.
    I work for a fine spirits company. We have an entire floor devoted to R&D. This floor also contains a sophisticated tasting lab where you can participate in blind taste tests. I'm not to sure of the methodology behind it, but there are three samples presented before you in a completely blind fashion along with a touch computer screen. There are many stations suitable for many participants. You taste each of the three samples and rate them according to questions on the screen - sweet, tart, taste wheel, overtones, color, etc. Sometimes there are two same samples I believe.
    Is this similar to the kind of double blind tests you refer to? If so I'm curious what kind of crudentials listeners must present in order to take part in said audio double blind tests.
    In this lab testers must pass a rigourous two month course on tasting in order to assertain and accurately describe what they are tasting on the taste and odor wheel. Same can be said for audio, maybe we should make an audio/music wheel? In all seriousness...warm, bright, smooth, tinny, silky, strong. those could represent the six segments of the wheel with other graduations within each segment.
    This course and acompanying tests are to judge the tasters accuracy and sensitivity. One may taste oak, while another may taste brand new charred, white oak with a hint of caramel and cinnimon. The latter is called a super-taster. One with a high physical concentration of taste buds and the perception to use them. CANNOT THE SAME BE SAID FOR AUDIO?
    In fact, Chu please feel free to copy most of my posts above and lets start a sensory perception thread. Maybe we'll be on to something and develop a new method of testing audio gear. Or maybe its been tried before, don't know.
    Thanks for listening, this whole idea hit me while sipping a fine wine this evening and listenging to some Santana. I do so preserve and love that disc. [​IMG]
    Curious as ever,
    John Royster
     
  6. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    What you're talking about are called triangle tests and they're sole purpose is to look for differences. They most certainly can be done double blind and they are emminently suited for that purpose. Larger companies, those with financial resources extend these tests even to more informal groupings throughout the country. Product branding, the knowing that your hamburger will taste the same no matter where you are is important. That's a bit of an oversimplification as other issues also come into play. For example, certain regional preferences exist as to say mustard. In some parts of the country, mustard is typically added as a condiment. In other parts, no. In the triangle test as typically performed there are no 'tricks' shall we say. By 'trick' I mean that often quoted example of saying i've switched this radio shack speaker wire with this $500/ft Voodoo WhoDo. Two samples are identical, one is different. Different how? Depends on what the company is looking for. Could be a different mixing order, different raw material supplier, different substitution of a raw material (corn syrup for cane sugar), etc. Always one is different. The objective is simple. Pick the different one. The results are analyzed statistically and by increasing the sample size (people that are testing) Type 2 errors are minimized. Yes training goes on and there's no reason why people can't and aren't also trained in audio matters. The training is done to teach people what to look for be it sweetness, texture, a hint of a particular flavor and so forth. Training sensitizes people and enables them to approach the limits, whatever they may be, of human detection. This is important for a variety of reasons. It help them understand manufacturing tolerances so that they can aim for a true 'middle' and know when a product is out of specification for example. Now don't get me started as to why 'reputable' magazines and companies don't do it for certain products. I'll offer it as IMHO that there a definite financial advantage to leave areas intentionally hazy and to use pseudo-science and odd-ball analogies to cover it up.
    In the areas of speakers, while not triangle based, consider this link that speaks a bit of listener training.
    http://www.mastersonaudio.com/features/20001101.htm
    Ideally you're quite right, people ought to be sensitized and trained/evaluated and there are some places on the web that provide some means for individuals to that. This would enable them to be more critical listeners but usually the approach that's taken is to select a musical piece that your familiar with. There's far more to this and if you feel like it, just search under my name and the word testing and you'll get an overview on reasonable methodology at least as I see it.
     

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