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Artanis

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Relative to the museum idea: I just went to a little soiree and spoke with a twenty-something couple that stated they've never seen a black & white movie. They absolutely will not watch a movie in B&W. Ever.

I would gather that mindset is much more the norm, than not. Nostalgia to them is a Nokia phone.
 
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Ron Lee Green

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Relative to the museum idea: I just went to a little soiree and spoke with a twenty something couple that stated they've never seen a black & white movie. They absolutely will not watch a movie in B&W. Ever.

I would gather that mindset is much more the norm, than not. Nostalgia to them is a Nokia phone.
I had a co-worker like that. I remember when they remade the movie Psycho (with Anne Heche and Vince Vaughn) in color, shot-by-shot, back in 1998 because there were people like him who wouldn't watch the original movie because it was in b&w.
 

bmasters9

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Relative to the museum idea: I just went to a little soiree and spoke with a twenty-something couple that stated they've never seen a black & white movie. They absolutely will not watch a movie in B&W. Ever.

I would gather that mindset is much more the norm, than not. Nostalgia to them is a Nokia phone.

That's just like those who refuse to see any great television series because it's B/W-- it's their freedom of course (who am I to judge?), but I just do not understand it (after all, as I've said before, there are quite a few great series I have in my DVD collection that are B/W and were very well made then).
 

Nick*Z

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If such a museum were ever built, it would need to have dynamic exhibitions that are regularly refreshed to add in recent stars/productions that teens would know.
Again, such an endeavor was proposed by the late Debbie Reynolds who had one of the most fabulously curated collections of Hollywood memorabilia and there were NO takers. Before her, the daughter of the late Marlene Dietrich tried to establish a permanent residence for her mother's massive consignment of props, posters, costumes, etc. that Dietrich had kept for decades. Again, apart from private collectors, there were NO takers.

Please don't misunderstand. I believe all of this to be a travesty. Wiping out history with a bulldozer mentality, as was done with the stripping down to bedrock of MGM in the late 70's, is obscene. But it's also reality. I take no pleasure in this reality. I often dream what would have become of such a vast archive had some conscientious collector with very deep pockets had just gone ahead and built his/her own museum and bequeathed a ton of money after his/her death to keep it going.

But the old Hollywood archives are considered nothing more than relics by the people with the money. And relics often do not survive the transitioning from one generation to the next. So, goodbye Liberace museum - another exquisitely curated collection of memorabilia devoted to one of the most iconic performers of the 20th century. Such is life. One man's gold is another's garage sale. How depressing.
 

Desslar

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Relative to the museum idea: I just went to a little soiree and spoke with a twenty-something couple that stated they've never seen a black & white movie. They absolutely will not watch a movie in B&W. Ever.

I would gather that mindset is much more the norm, than not. Nostalgia to them is a Nokia phone.

What was their reason for not watching a B&W film? Visually unpleasant? Seems outdated? Other?

I see lots of comments on Youtube uploads of TV shows/movies/home videos (new and old) which complain very loudly (and obnoxiously) that the picture quality is not in perfect HD and therefore is unwatchable, even though the only source available may be quite old and/or in poor shape.

So I think many people are spoiled these days by the wealth of HD digital content available. If something doesn't look perfect they can't be bothered to watch it, no matter how amazing the story and performances may be. Undoubtedly they would consider B&W content to look less than perfect.

Again, such an endeavor was proposed by the late Debbie Reynolds who had one of the most fabulously curated collections of Hollywood memorabilia and there were NO takers. Before her, the daughter of the late Marlene Dietrich tried to establish a permanent residence for her mother's massive consignment of props, posters, costumes, etc. that Dietrich had kept for decades. Again, apart from private collectors, there were NO takers.

Please don't misunderstand. I believe all of this to be a travesty. Wiping out history with a bulldozer mentality, as was done with the stripping down to bedrock of MGM in the late 70's, is obscene. But it's also reality. I take no pleasure in this reality. I often dream what would have become of such a vast archive had some conscientious collector with very deep pockets had just gone ahead and built his/her own museum and bequeathed a ton of money after his/her death to keep it going.

But the old Hollywood archives are considered nothing more than relics by the people with the money. And relics often do not survive the transitioning from one generation to the next. So, goodbye Liberace museum - another exquisitely curated collection of memorabilia devoted to one of the most iconic performers of the 20th century. Such is life. One man's gold is another's garage sale. How depressing.

In that case, it falls upon the shoulders of us the fans to create online digital archives to preserve cinema/TV history. There used to be a lot of great fansites dedicated to specific film franchises or TV series. Not sure if there are as many these days.
 

KPmusmag

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This is a shame. But they’re not touching the lot that is part of the WB studio tour? That one includes the exterior of Gotham City Police Headquarters from the 1966 Batman. That might be too much to bear.

No, that is actually a different lot. What is being torn down is the Warner Ranch about 1.5 miles away from the main Warner Bros lot where Gotham Police headquarters set is.
 

RobertMG

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great pic before bewitched house was built by the garage
1655162033614.png
 
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BobO'Link

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Relative to the museum idea: I just went to a little soiree and spoke with a twenty-something couple that stated they've never seen a black & white movie. They absolutely will not watch a movie in B&W. Ever.

I would gather that mindset is much more the norm, than not. Nostalgia to them is a Nokia phone.
I work with a late 20ish woman who *used* to have that mentality. She loves horror films and we often discuss them. I discovered she likes werewolf movies and vampires. One day when I was talking about some classic BW horror films she proclaimed she had no interest in watching BW films so I challenged her with "Let me bring you a half dozen BW movies. Watch them all and then if you didn't like them or never want to see a BW movie again I'll drop the subject." She agreed. I took her King Kong (1933), The Wolf Man (1941), Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), and The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). She loved them all and came in asking for more - and in other genres. I took her comedies, musicals, noir (which she *really* liked - almost as much as the horror films) and she now seeks out BW movies from the 30s-50s on her own.

Frankly, I just don't understand such mentality as it excludes huge amounts of film history and some absolutely incredible movies and TV series. In addition, BW isn't all about having no money for color and they'd have used color had it been affordable but was frequently about the artistic merit of filming in BW. There are things that can be done with shadows and grey scale imagery that's impossible to duplicate in color. For me, a horror film can be much more frightening in BW than in color. I've mentioned before that the first time I saw The Exorcist was on a BW TV. I found it to be more frightening than I thought it would be. I later saw it in color and it didn't have the same impact (some scenes I found humorous due to the color) so I tried BW again. It was more frightening/disturbing that way so I now always watch it with the color turned off. Part of that could be the era in which I grew up - but I know people my age who also grew up in the era of BW TV that refuse to watch anything in BW so go figure...

Unfortunately, there are far more people who refuse to watch anything in BW than those of us who *do* watch BW films and TV series - regularly. That's one reason colorization was so popular for a while. If they could ever work out all of the bugs in the process I'd expect you'd see far more classic BW movies and TV series colorized.
 

Desslar

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I work with a late 20ish woman who *used* to have that mentality. She loves horror films and we often discuss them. I discovered she likes werewolf movies and vampires. One day when I was talking about some classic BW horror films she proclaimed she had no interest in watching BW films so I challenged her with "Let me bring you a half dozen BW movies. Watch them all and then if you didn't like them or never want to see a BW movie again I'll drop the subject." She agreed. I took her King Kong (1933), The Wolf Man (1941), Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), and The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). She loved them all and came in asking for more - and in other genres. I took her comedies, musicals, noir (which she *really* liked - almost as much as the horror films) and she now seeks out BW movies from the 30s-50s on her own.

Frankly, I just don't understand such mentality as it excludes huge amounts of film history and some absolutely incredible movies and TV series. In addition, BW isn't all about having no money for color and they'd have used color had it been affordable but was frequently about the artistic merit of filming in BW. There are things that can be done with shadows and grey scale imagery that's impossible to duplicate in color. For me, a horror film can be much more frightening in BW than in color. I've mentioned before that the first time I saw The Exorcist was on a BW TV. I found it to be more frightening than I thought it would be. I later saw it in color and it didn't have the same impact (some scenes I found humorous due to the color) so I tried BW again. It was more frightening/disturbing that way so I now always watch it with the color turned off. Part of that could be the era in which I grew up - but I know people my age who also grew up in the era of BW TV that refuse to watch anything in BW so go figure...

Unfortunately, there are far more people who refuse to watch anything in BW than those of us who *do* watch BW films and TV series - regularly. That's one reason colorization was so popular for a while. If they could ever work out all of the bugs in the process I'd expect you'd see far more classic BW movies and TV series colorized.
I think it really depends on what people grew up with. Although I grew up in the color TV era, for a time there was still a lot of BW movies (and a few TV shows) on TV. So BW productions are not strange to me, and I am totally open to watching them.

On the other hand, very few silent films were shown on TV in my time. I think one or two Chaplin films would pop up on rare occasions, but that was about it. So I never really got into silent films that much. With the exception of a few comedies (mostly Buster Keaton), I do usually find silent films are a bit hard to sit through. Especially if the home video version uses some grating and repetitive soundtrack, which seems to be common for streaming offerings.

Getting back to BW, to be honest, I wish Hollywood would have switched predominantly to color in the 40s. There's so many films, and a few TV shows in the 40s-60s that I think would be amazing to see in color. Since we're talking TV here, I would love to see Naked City and Route 66 in color, because they provide a wide-ranging view of what America looked like in those days.
 

bmasters9

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Getting back to BW, to be honest, I wish Hollywood would have switched predominantly to color in the 40s. There's so many films, and a few TV shows in the 40s-60s that I think would be amazing to see in color. Since we're talking TV here, I would love to see Naked City and Route 66 in color, because they provide a wide-ranging view of what America looked like in those days.

M Squad, I'd like to see in color myself.
 

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