Going Digital. An article for you EEs out there.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Steve_Ma, Jan 16, 2002.

  1. Steve_Ma

    Steve_Ma Second Unit

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  2. Jagan Seshadri

    Jagan Seshadri Supporting Actor

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    Thanks, Steve, for sharing this.
    I would say that their argument of "high quality sound" is a bit of a marketing slant. As an EE, I'd say that the biggest advantage in using pulse-width modulation amplification would be the efficiency.
    You'll definitely see more of this is portable electronics, in order to have them run longer on a set of batteries. Have you heard of Tripath Technology's "Class T" chips? Portable electronics is where they'll make their money. Think about it...We're not just talking about walkmans, but cellphones, next-generation PDA's, handheld gaming systems and so on.
    As for PWM amplification catching on in the mainstream audio world, it's already kind of happening. After all, SACD records waveforms is a PWM-ish manner, so those recordings would not even have to go through all the PCM->PWM conversion stages; you'd just run it directly to the output amplifier stage.
    Interesting article, and definitely the way that things will be going. Whether or not this means better audio fidelity remains to be seen, but it's not a bad idea at all.
    -JNS
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    A few months ago, one of the HT magazines reported on a high-end speaker system that basically did this.

    The central "receiver" took in the digital signal from a CD/DVD and did lots of processing on it. It took care of time delays, equalization, etc....

    Then it send the sounds to each DRIVER digitally (Yes, DRIVER, not speaker). Each driver had a small monoblock and a A/D circuit. All the equalizations/crossover/volume level issues were taken care of at the central processor on a driver-by-driver level.

    Very cool system. But for the $15,000 price tag, it should be.

    Talk about using a SPL meter to level adjust: now you can level adjust each driver.
     

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