Getting lost on _Mulholland Dr._

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jack Briggs, Sep 15, 2002.

  1. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Driving up Benedict Canyon Road at night and turning left onto Mulholland Drive, one sees the Los Angeles of international fantasy. The city does look kind of unreal. And the serpentine road itself meanders and twists just about as much as David Lynch's waking dream of a film.

    Lynch is taken to task for not authorizing such extras as alternate scenes on the DVD versions of his films. Which is interesting, given that Mulholland Dr. is an extended series of alternate endings and varying points of view. It's The French Lieutenant's Woman meets The Player meets Eyes Wide Shut. Dreams blend seamlessly with reality in this City of Dreams as portrayed in a film about films.

    Naomi Watts's naively goody-two-shoes of an actress, Betty, reminds one of the improbably good-natured Domino in Eyes Wide Shut—as in, this can't be real. And the transmogrification of who is acting and who is reacting becomes complete when Betty and Laura Harring's Rita exchange roles as the film unspools. It's like a darker take on the "mirror scene" in the Marx Brothers's Duck Soup where Groucho and his "reflection" (Harpo) eventually "trade places."

    Where does the dream end and the reality begin?

    Mulholland Dr. is a daring exercise in intellectual play. In the end, one is not quite sure what exactly has played out, but he or she knows something significant truly has transpired. But what was it?

    Multilayered and multi-dimensioned, Mulholland Dr. paints a starkly vivid portrait of Los Angeles by grossly distorting and caricaturizing it. The result is a city that seems more real yet less so than it truly is.

    Bravura filmmaking, a classic. One of the great films of our time. A masterpiece.

    (As an aside, much of this film was shot in and around my own neighborhood. Talk about looking into a mirror. More like a funhouse mirror.)
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,761
    Likes Received:
    485
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
  3. Mitty

    Mitty Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 1999
    Messages:
    886
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  4. Paul_D

    Paul_D Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    [c]http://www.geocities.com/holiday_photos/signatures/mulhollanddrive/mulhollanddrive_big0.txt
    "This is the girl."[/c]
    I've developed a fascination with this film since first seeing it in a theater. Having been a fan of Lynch's films for quite some time now, I feel its often leaves you very frustrated if you try to unravel the plot and 'make sense of it' as you would any traditional narrative. Its so densely structured, and it's reality/fantasy lines so blurred, that its far more rewarding to watch it as if you yourself are in a dream. On that level, the only sequence that left me very uncomfortable (not anxiety - the whole film left me with feeling anxious, but dissatisfied) was the 'Silencio' scene. Whatever symbolic meaning it might have, I felt it didn't sit right in the film, and its the one scene I always skip whenever I watch it again.
    The one scene that creeps me out immensely is Adam's meeting with The Cowboy. Their conversation is polite, yet so loaded with menace, mystery and hostility. Along with the flickering light, and the pale, ghost-like face, I feel chills up my neck whenever I see it.
    A classic film. In Lynch's world, I think I only enjoy Blue Velvet and The Straight Story as much. I love Lost Highway purely for the cinematography and imagery, but Mulholland Drive has the aesthetic pleasures of that film, coupled with a whole new level of Lynchian meaningful madness. Superb. But don't think too hard, otherwise you'll end up looking like Dan here.
    [c]http://www.geocities.com/holiday_photos/signatures/mulhollanddrive/mulhollanddrive_big1.txt
    [​IMG][/c]
     
  5. Edwin Pereyra

    Edwin Pereyra Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 1998
    Messages:
    3,500
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome to the club, Mr. Briggs.

    ~Edwin
     
  6. Justin_S

    Justin_S Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    3,577
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    110
    MULHOLLAND DRIVE is not only the best film of 2001 and Lynch's best film, but it is also one of the absolute best films of all time! Words cannot do this masterpiece justice. I was absolutely drueling in anticipation of the DVD release back when I had it preordered. I have watched my DVD of this classic 16 times since I got it. Brilliant film in every possible way, and Naomi Watts is hotter than hellfire, as well as a superb actress!

     
  7. Morgan Jolley

    Morgan Jolley Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2000
    Messages:
    8,888
    Likes Received:
    132
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    If there's one thing that cannot be said over and over again and be even more true each time it is said, then it would be that Naomi Watts was screwed over for the Oscar.
     
  8. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1998
    Messages:
    7,585
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I need to post here just to have my latest sig appear. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The song is "Celebrity Skin" by Hole, for those who didn't know.
     
  9. Quentin

    Quentin Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Messages:
    2,670
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Real Name:
    Quentin H
    How can I not partake in another "Mulholland Drive" discussion?

    My favorite film of last year. My favorite Lynch film. An amazing piece of work.

    Nice sig, Seth...
     
  10. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2000
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    IMO Best movie of 2001.
    Didn't make sense until I read some of the interpretations here. But the meaning is just icing on the cake, as IMO it isn't the point of the movie.
    I was quite dissapointed in Blue Velvet after MD.
    OK now, how many in this thread have wondered what "transmogrification" means but are afraid to ask? [​IMG]
    --
    Holadem
     
  11. JonZ

    JonZ Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 1998
    Messages:
    7,798
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    0
    "transmogrification"
    I do, first heard that term in a Calvin & Hobbes cartoon[​IMG]
     
  12. Joseph Young

    Joseph Young Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2001
    Messages:
    1,352
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Great sig Seth! And awesome stills, Paul.

     
  13. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2001
    Messages:
    4,951
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Before watching MD, I hated David Lynch.

    Now he is one of my favorites. I've learend to "trust" him. It is a great feeling when you can do that with an artist.

    Best
    Movie
    Ever
     
  14. Russ Lucas

    Russ Lucas Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2000
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'll add to the chorus of praise for the movie. One element of the film that I've really come to admire is the way that Lynch knitted it from the TV pilot, and the way that all of the engenue/detective story/bumbling hitman/mob guys conventions that would have presumably been the focus of the (hypothetical) TV series get turned inside-out and become, in effect, nightmares instead of dreams.
    In an alternate universe, I'd really like to see how the TV series would have played out. The pilot was reviewed here, and it's fairly easy to see which of the shots were added later. Still, I'm curious if any were taken out of the pilot, and a few of the scenes it seems to me could either have been in or out of the pilot. For example, Herring and Watts climbing into Selwyn's apartment and finding her dead and the above-referenced Club Silencio scene. I wonder if those were in or out of the pilot.
    Of course, turning the story into a dream story allows for some of the rough edges to get smoothed over a bit, I think. The scene with the hitman and his pal in the dingy office and the scene with the meeting between the mobsters and the producer and director might have worked a little better in the context of the pilot, in my opinion.
    Although I'm not a child of the fifties, I always love Lynch's reimaginings and reenactments of pieces of fifties culture. I have to admit I'm really captivated by the two music auditions. I wonder whether that was to be an extended storyline. I'd like to have seen what Adam's film looked like. Still, I love what we got.
     
  15. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The use of music in this film is key to its success. Few recent films are so good at evoking moods as this one. And few recent films have have been so enjoyable that I want to see them again almost immediately.
     
  16. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2001
    Messages:
    4,951
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  17. Greg_C_T

    Greg_C_T Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2001
    Messages:
    293
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Was anybody else *completely* freaked out by the first encounter with "the monster" behind the diner?
    I guess I really connected with the character and felt his sense of dread as he walked out back. The music effects and the way the scene was filmed just got to me. [​IMG]
     
  18. Justin_S

    Justin_S Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    3,577
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    110
     
  19. Paul_D

    Paul_D Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  20. Jeremy Stockwell

    Jeremy Stockwell Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2001
    Messages:
    608
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0


    That scene was frightening, yes. But with the build-up, you almost expect something to jump out (OK, I jumped too :b).

    The character that really freaked me out was "The Cowboy"

    Doesn't have the shock factor, but to me, definitely scarier.

    JKS
     

Share This Page