Garage Beer Fridge...seperate circuit?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Alec M, Jul 14, 2002.

  1. Alec M

    Alec M Agent

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    We are getting ready to build a house in Orlando, and are deciding on dedicated circuits. I already added a 20amp circuit for the HT, but was wondering what you all think I need for a beer fridge and freezer in the garage?

    I have heard that I can go with existing circuits, but they may trip more often.

    I could go with a 15 amp seperate circuit that will have GFI outlets (req'd by code in garage).

    Or go with 20amp, and the GFIs, and change them to normal outlets after closing so that outlet won't trip by fridge, but I'll still be protected since it is on its own circuit.

    Anyone.....Bueller???
     
  2. Paul Jenkins

    Paul Jenkins Supporting Actor

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    How large is the refrigerator and what is its rated power consumpution? That, and the other items you want to share that circuit, will tell you whether you need a dedicated circuit...
    btw, most dedicated circuits are overkill for home theater, unless you do it for power isolation or have large amps. A 'typical' 5.1 system with an integrated amp, one sub, and 5-6 components draws way less than 20 amps... (of course, those with dedicated amps for each channel will pipe in otherwise, note that i did say "typical" [​IMG])
     
  3. Alec M

    Alec M Agent

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    We don't have the beer fridge or freezer yet, but I want to be future ready. They will be the only things on this circuit if I do it. The builder said I should go with 15amp, but the 20 amp is only $15 more.

    Are there any negatives in going 'too big' 20 vs 15 when you don't need it?

    As for the HT, I have a 500W recv, 400W HK amp, and 375W sub (eventually will get Paradigm Servo 15), plus CD changer, dvd, 2 vcrs, tape deck and speaker selector.

    I will also have it pre-wired for FPTV which may draw some power.
     
  4. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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    You know, if you really wanted to have a true beer fridge, you could do what a friend of mine did to his. After removing all of the interior shelves, he then put a piece of plywood at the bottom to support a keg. He drilled a hole in the side, picked up a CO2 tank, ran the hoses accordingly, and voila. He now has his beer of choice on tap for all to enjoy. [​IMG]
     
  5. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    I wouldn't put a fridge or freezer in the garage here. My average garage temp is well over 100deg all day long. If you park your hot (engine) car in it, like I do, it can peak above 120. That'll work a fridge/freezer extra hard.

    Is your laundry room big enough for one? Many of the larger new homes here are.

    Just a thought.

    Todd
     
  6. Alec M

    Alec M Agent

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    Todd, that's a good point...our utility room is pretty big. I just need to measure out room for the smart home panel and future computer, and see if it would fit.

    I thought about a kegerator as I have helped make a couple, but I decided that I would rather have a wide selection of beers vs a keg.

    I may end up with a compromise and get a normal fridge that I get the fridge for beer, and my wife get the freezer...
     
  7. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

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    A dedicated 15 amp would be plenty. Actually, it would be overkill, but you might want to add a deep freezer to go with your beer fridge, or something. Anyway, I'd run it. I'm of the thinking that you can never have enough circuits or wires in the wall. I ran four RG6 coax, 6 cat5 and 4 four pair audio to the wall behind my TV. It still wasn't enough. Last week I moved my DVD player off the top of my TV and to the other side of the house with the rest of my equipment. Had to run 3 more RG6 lines to handle the component video.

    As for the "no need for a dedicated circuit in your HT" crowd - I don't have an awful lot of equipment in my media room, but between the file servers & HT equipment, if my daughter tries to dry her hair in the bathroom on that side of the house, the breaker trips. I'm getting ready to run a dedicated 20 amp circuit just for that single equipment rack. You have to consider the rest of the circuit, not just the HT. I'd imagine an average home theater is eating 5 to 10 amps when fully powered up. That doesn't leave a lot of room for lighting and other appliances on the same circuit.
     
  8. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Real Name:
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  9. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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