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Gaming Rig Build. Suggestions? (1 Viewer)

Edwin-S

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When it comes to computers I tend to go overboard versus what I want and what I need. I always end up spending 3 to 4000 grand on these things because I don't want to replace a computer every two years. Therefore, I always go for more power than I will probably ever use during the lifetime of the machine. Case in point, I found a build for a game rig at site called "Tech *Buyer's* Guru". The rig they spec'd out was a 2500 US build. The components are as follows:

CPU: Intel Core I7-8700K
MoBo: MSI z370 SLI Plus
GPU: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070TI x2
RAM: Corsair 2x8GB Vengeance RGB DDR4-3466
SSD: SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB
Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro
PS: Corsair RM850x Gold
Cooling: ThermalTake Water 3.0 Riing RGB 240
OS: Windows 10 Home, but I would rather use Pro instead.

If I was to build this, the cost, right now, minus the CPU, is 3,282, give or take a few cents. I would have to order the CPU from NewEgg.ca for 499 +10 for shipping, so around 570 with taxes in. Total cost is 3852. Pretty far from 2500. LOL
Dropping one of the GPU cards, for the time being, would bring the cost down to 3,510. This is just the box: no keyboard, mouse or monitor.

i'm curious what a manufactured computer with similar specs would cost compared to building this. Any suggestions for something a bit more economical, but with the ability to output up to 4K.
 

Sam Posten

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Spending 3+ grand for a PC with twin 1070s is pure crazy. There's nothing you can play today that doesn't look awesome on a 4k TV with a single 1070, but if you NEED more than that go for a single 1080TI.
 

Edwin-S

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I was thinking about dropping the extra 1070 to reduce the cost of this. Dropping the extra 1070 would put this system around 3500 canadian with what I have listed here.

I'm also looking at PC mag component list for a rig, but I haven't had time to price it out. I don't have a problem going to a cheaper processor as well, but I do want the ability to swap out for better processors when prices drop, so a MoBo with some longevity when it comes to upgrading is a must.
 

Sam Posten

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Edwin-S

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An Alienware Area 51 with an 17-7800, 16MB of 2400MHz RAM and a GTX 1080 Ti card is about 3550 Canadian before taxes. The Alienware storage is a 128GB M.2 SSD + 2TB 7200 RPM HDD.

For about 3300 all in, I could build the PC Gamer second tier system with the same 1080 Ti card, 16MB of RAM, 1TB SSD and an I7-8700k processor. I'm still undecided about whether I want to go all out and spend this kind of dough. I'm afraid I'll go hog wild and then the thing will end up being used for just web-surfing, streaming and downloading tunes.

Also, I'm still undecided on whether I really want to go back to a desktop from a laptop system/
 

Sam Posten

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For the record I've got a great gaming PC and am spending 90% of my time right now on cheap Xbox games because HDR makes all the difference. And I play xbox on a 55" OLED. There's no comparable monitor i could get sub 30 inches that would work for me on PC. If you want to PC at 55+ inches tho a lot of PC games support HDR now.
 

Edwin-S

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Do any of the GPU's, like the 1080TI, support output in HDR? They don't seem to mention that in any of the specs.

Edit: Also, I'm wondering how that PCG rig would handle doing 2D and 3D animation if a person wanted to experiment with that?
 

Sam Posten

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Edwin-S

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I'm thinking on settling for an Alienware Aurora with the following specs.

I7-8700K processor
Windows 10 pro
16GB Dual Channel 2666MHz RAM
GTX 1070 8Gb DDR5
512Gb M.2 NVME SSD + 1TB 7200 SATA HDD
Killer 1535 WiFi

I'm still trying to decide if it would be better to buy the 1070 and then upgrade to the 1080TI when (and if) prices start to decline or split the difference and go with the 1080. Is the TI really that big a boost over the other two cards? Right now, with a 1080 card the total is C$3521. The cost before taxes 3130

This config with a 1070 would be $3293. The cost before taxes 2898.

The 16GB of RAM is a bit of a poser, since DELL installs a single 16GB DIMM, making the RAM single channel. A lot of guys don't like that arrangement. I guess they think it is slower than a dual channel config with two matching 8GB sticks. The problem with the single stick is that it becomes difficult to get another stick that matches properly if you don't buy it up front. 32GB seems like overkill, but my main reason to *not* buy it is that it pushes the price up by another 250 bucks. Does it really make that big a difference to go dual channel over single channel?

Edit: Neither of these configs include a monitor.
 
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Edwin-S

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Unfortunately, I can't go to the US site. Dell redirects to their Canadian site if a person tries to open your link. I forgot to add that there is a gaming keyboard and mouse in my original pricing. Still, using XE.com to get a rough exchange rate difference, the 1800 US price you mentioned would be about 2282 in Canadian toilet dollars.

If I could order out of the States, it would probably be between 3000 and 3200 dollars. However, like I mentioned, I can't access the US site even to compare prices. The 1800 was for the configuration I posted with a 1070 in it?
 

DaveF

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When it comes to computers I tend to go overboard versus what I want and what I need. I always end up spending 3 to 4000 grand on these things because I don't want to replace a computer every two years.
Do you do component upgrades? I assume that’s still a viable approach to managing performance and cost over a gaming systems life.
 

Clinton McClure

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The 16GB of RAM is a bit of a poser, since DELL installs a single 16GB DIMM, making the RAM single channel. A lot of guys don't like that arrangement. I guess they think it is slower than a dual channel config with two matching 8GB sticks. The problem with the single stick is that it becomes difficult to get another stick that matches properly if you don't buy it up front. 32GB seems like overkill, but my main reason to *not* buy it is that it pushes the price up by another 250 bucks. Does it really make that big a difference to go dual channel over single channel?
Theoretically, a dual-channel DIMM arrangement is faster than a single-channel because you have increased bandwidth with dual-channel. Will you see any tangible difference with dual vs single? I honestly can't answer that because I have always just put two sticks of decent RAM in whatever I was building and called it a day. You can always get a matching pair of 8GB sticks then replace them with a matching pair of 16GB sticks down the road if you feel you can justify the price vs performance.

*Edited to correct grammatical errors.
 

Chris Strnad

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I always end up spending 3 to 4000 grand on these things because I don't want to replace a computer every two years.
If playing PC games is not a source of income and you don't have money to burn, scale everything back...

I like to use the recommendations from Tom's Hardware as a general guide. Get an i5 cpu, K-series if you want to scratch the overclocking itch. Looks like a single 1080 is good for 4K. Nvme is the way to go for the system drive; 128gb is enough if you redirect doc/music/video and game folders to other storage.

Closed-loop liquid cooling is pretty awesome. The Corsair H115i can keep my Skylake i5 at a solid 34F under full load at 50F ambient--the pump and fans never kick up to an audible level. The only problem is that the lack of a fan on the CPU. You'll want to add a fan to keep the m2/nvme storage cool...
 

Edwin-S

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While I was looking for my mic to do a YPAO calibration on my home theatre set up, I started noticing all of the half done projects that I seem to start and never finish. For that reason, while I'm sute I could put one of these things together, I think I'm going to steer clear of doing a build. With my present attention span, it would probably end up sitting in boxes in a corner of my house.

Do you do component upgrades? I assume that’s still a viable approach to managing performance and cost over a gaming systems life.

My last system was a laptop. Not much upgrade overhead there. That is why I am thinking of going back to a desktop. More overhead for upgrading; however, less convenience as far as use goes. A person is kind of limited to using it in a home office.

I'd like to get a new machine, but I have to admit that I am getting a bit tired of continuously dropping so much money on a depreciating asset, especially a computer that seems to be obsolete before it even gets delivered. On the other hand, I don't want to go cheap and then find out I have to go through the whole process again in a couple years. It is why I tend to go toward the expensive end up front. It may seem stupid, but I'd rather have the capability and not use then find out I need it and not have it, due to me thinking I was saving a few dollars up front.

The other reason, I was thinking of Dell's Alienware Aurora is that I can use their money interest-free for a year, as long as I'm paid up within that span. Doing my own build, I'd have to put all of that stuff on my card or credit line and begin paying interest immediately and I don't really think my costs to build vs buy would be all that different after factoring in exchange, shipping and whatever other costs might surface.
 

DaveF

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^
I asked because you posed the extreme scenarios of spending $5000 on a new PC to last a decade...or throwing away cheap PCs every year.

There’s the affordable practical middle ground that all DIY PC gamers I know take: build a decent machine and do component upgrades as needed over several years.
——-

To your point, that’s why I’m console only and have left PC gaming. It’s cheaper and easier and works with the comfortable big-screen surround sound living room / media room setup.
 

DaveF

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DIY PC build is a solid weekend to assemble and get Windows booted. And then another month of scattered evening work to get all the software and drivers tuned and working.

If you have a good computer store nearby. If not, add two weeks for shoppping online dumb things you find you missed when you start the build. :)

Or so it went with my $1500 HTPC
 

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