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Game of Thrones Season 4 (news and episodes discussion) (1 Viewer)

oscar_merkx

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Hi
Here is a dedicated thread for Season 4 news
http://insidetv.ew.com/2013/04/02/ga...ageID=20470532

Quote:
It is known: HBO’s Game of Thrones will continue its epic tale into a fourth season.
The network just renewed the show for 10 episodes to premiere next year.
The announcement was expected. Thrones returned to series-high ratings on Sunday night and stands as the network’s biggest current moneymaker. The show’s annual production cost (north of $55 million per season) is offset by strong international and DVD sales. If ratings trends for Thrones and HBO’s top-rated True Blood continue this year, Thrones could replace the vampire drama as the network’s most-popular show.
Creative details for the fourth season have not been announced, but Thrones is expected to primarily use material from back half of the lengthy third book in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire saga, A Storm of Swords, as well as pull in content from other novels in the series.
 

Rex Bachmann

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I've avoided the Game of Thrones threads, since I don't subscribe to premium cable and haven't yet seen or read details about season 3 and don't want to know in advance what happens there. I'll try to wait for the discs.

I've got a question for the Brits (or other connoisseurs of British etiquette). Why don't the characters address and refer to the kings, queens, and princelings as "Majesty" or "Highness"? What's up with the "Your Grace"-bit?

I thought that title was reserved for archbishops (and "dukes"?). What am I missing?
 

Simon Massey

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I think it has something to do with Henry VIII as I think Kings and Queens were called Your Grace before him. Probably something to do with the shift from Catholicism to Protestant. I believe Kings and Queens of Scotland were also called Your Grace before the Union
 

Josh Dial

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Simon Massey said:
I think it has something to do with Henry VIII as I think Kings and Queens were called Your Grace before him. Probably something to do with the shift from Catholicism to Protestant. I believe Kings and Queens of Scotland were also called Your Grace before the Union
This is roughly correct.

Nowadays, "Your Majesty" works. Heck, our current Queen (of Canada) allows for "Ma'am."
 

Hanson

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There are also some made up titles here and there. You can't hear the difference, but knights in the novels are addressed as "Ser" rather than "Sir". It took me a while to get used to that because it seemed like such a random change. But it really drove home that this was not our history.
 

Rex Bachmann

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Post #3:

Why don't the characters address and refer to the kings, queens, and princelings as "Majesty" or "Highness"? What's up with the "Your Grace"-bit?

I thought that title was reserved for archbishops (and "dukes"?). What am I missing?

Charlie Campisi wrote (post #4):

. . . . I'm just a silly American. :)

That part I'm sure you got right.
 

Josh Dial

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Um, the source material's influences are not a secret. Indeed, back in the 90s, I remember that Book 1 was often described as a loose re-telling of the War of the Roses. Obviously that isn't completely accurate, but the implications are clear.

ASOIAF is not our history, but it certainly draws heavily on it (as some of the best tales are wont to do). This is sort of an indisputable fact.
 

Jeff Cooper

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fic·tion[fik-shuh
thinsp.png
thinsp.png
n] Show IPA
noun
1. the class of literature comprising works of imaginative narration, especially in prose form.
2. works of this class, as novels or short stories: detective fiction.
3. something feigned, invented, or imagined; a made-up story: We've all heard the fiction of her being in delicate health.
4. the act of feigning, inventing, or imagining.
5. an imaginary thing or event, postulated for the purposes of argument or explanation.
 

Simon Massey

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Rex

As to whether I know, I can only point to learning this in school over 20 odd years ago. Im not sure how you wish me to know for a fact, just trying to answer your question. Thats what my History teacher told us :)

UK education system in my time tended to cover World History more than British history so I didnt spend a lot of time on it.

I guess since Im a Lancastrian that makes me a Lannister!!! :)
 

Adam Lenhardt

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Certainly there is a strong basis in the War of the Roses in the A Song of Ice and Fire and there are plenty of historical allusions (the Wall is basically Hadrian's Wall on steroids) but just because the story pulls a lot from British history doesn't mean that Charlie was engaging in "flippant dishonesty" for pointing out that Westeros is not Great Britain. George R.R. Martin is the author of this universe and he is free to borrow, steal, distort and ignore from real world history as he sees fit. Why do some things track with real world history and others don't? Because that's the way the author wanted it. I don't think it's any more complicated than that.Certainly neither the books nor the show owe any allegiance or deference to the history they're borrowing from. Verisimilitude requires credibility; to be credible the fictional universe needs to operate with internal consistency. It does not need to mirror the real world.
 

Josh Dial

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So non-readers know, Adam's link contains a major spoiler.

If the description of the episode is correct, it pretty much confirms my guess about what the contents of season 4, and where the season is going to end (unless the show really plays around with the timeline).
 

Charlie Campisi

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My thinking about the article was the same as the first comment -- it would make more sense for that ep to be the penultimate ep of season 4 rather than the finale. They've done a great job of putting big events in ep 9 (execution of Ned, Blackwater, Red Wedding) and leaving the finale to clean up the pieces and set up the ensuing season. I thought Blackwater was shot very well, so I like the choice to bring him back.
 

Simon Massey

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Every news article seems to have decided to spoil exactly what event Marshall will be directing which is a bit annoying for me, though the event in question is not really a surprise in that its obviously coming at some point. Unfortunately, some have also spoiled the outcome.Should be good, I thought he did a great job with Blackwater, especially with the moments between the action.
 

Sam Favate

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Josh Dial said:
So non-readers know, Adam's link contains a major spoiler.

If the description of the episode is correct, it pretty much confirms my guess about what the contents of season 4, and where the season is going to end (unless the show really plays around with the timeline).
Wow, that article really does drop some big spoilers and it does so casually.
 

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