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Full range frequency response??? (1 Viewer)

Adam.Heckman

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Many people here have posted the corrections for the radio shack SPL meter for the lower frequencies, such as under 150hz.

Does this imply that above 150hz the RS SPL meter is pretty dead on? And if so, can I plot the frequency of my room throughout the audible frequency and work to flatten it out without trying to change the crossovers in my speakers? Such as through equalization? Is it possible to do any of this?

Just looking for some suggestions on how/if people flatten their response in room without building custom speakers and XOs.

Thanks for any/all responses I get to this fairly newb question.
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Adam,

From 125Hz-1.6kHz the meter is accurate within 0.5dB. From 1.6-8kHz it actually reads a little “hot.” Above 8Hhz it starts to “droop,” like it does in the low frequencies.

Sure, it’s possible to use equalization. But for the main speakers in a home theater, that usually ends up being a pretty pricey proposition, because it requires a separate equalizer for each channel. In addition, the only way to connect them is between the pre-amp outputs and amplifier inputs. Most receivers do not have a complete set of ins and outs for each channel, only for a few at best. So you have to add outboard amplifiers for those other channels. Considering that the price of good-quality equalizers is not cheap, by the time you accumulate 5-6 of them (or a good multi-channel unit) plus any needed amplifiers, it could easily set you back $1000-1500 – and that’s going bargain-basement with used equipment.

So, because of the high price and added complication to the system, most people do not equalize their main speakers. Generally they simply rely on the tone controls or carefully positioning to get the most from them.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

ChrisWiggles

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It is far more price effective to use room treatments. EQ without treatments is not a solution to the root problem, but rather the (IMO) misuse of a powerful tool to band-aid poor room acoustics.

Bass trapping, and other treatments will lead to superior imaging, better RT60 time, and much better performance of your system. On top of that, then it can be a good idea to add in an EQ for bass usually, to get things just right.

EQs are not magic devices, they can't work on RT60 and other things in the time domain, they can't fix nulls, etc. Get the room good, *then* EQ.

If you can only do one or the other, room treatment will be the much better option.
 

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