Front speaker placement

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Boris_V, Oct 17, 2001.

  1. Boris_V

    Boris_V Agent

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    My dilemma is the following: the center speaker will be about 0.5 meter above my head (off-axis). I know that's not the best position, since the tweeter and the midrange driver should be at the same level as the listeners ears, but it's the only option in my room. Now should i move the left/right front speakers upward so that all the front tweeters and midrange drivers would be in the same horizontal line to get the best possible left to right transition or should i position them at my ears level (on-axis) to get better sound reproduction from them?
     
  2. Jim A. Banville

    Jim A. Banville Supporting Actor

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    Most people have to place their center speaker a foot or two above their "ear-level". You could raise the main speakers, but I wouldn't go all the way to the same height as the center speaker. You don't want your whole soundstage to be that high if your display is at eye-level. Have you considered placing the center speaker under your screen? I built a small stand that places my center speaker directly in front of my rear projection TV, and directly below the screen. I think it sounds much more natural than above the TV since most people are accustomed to hearing sound from the TV's own speakers under or beside, but NEVER above, the TV screen.
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Boris- I think all you really need to do, is to angle the center speaker so that the cones are *pointed* towards you.
    Incidentally, coax speakers (ones where the tweeter is placed within the woofer), is *supposed* to be placed slightly off-axis, because there are nulls introduced with that design if you listen to them dead on.
    But the suggestion to try it under your TV is a good one too! Might be a lower angle away from your ears.
    ------------------
     
  4. Boris_V

    Boris_V Agent

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    I will probably tilt the center a little downward to compensate for the higher position.
    Thanks for you suggestions. Any more?
     
  5. Barry_B_B

    Barry_B_B Second Unit

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    Boris,
    My center sits on two sets of rubber feet atop my RPTV, higher in back to tilt towards listeners. Works great [​IMG]
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Here are some suggestions, but many great sounding systems violate some or all of these.
    You do not need to be nearly as obsessive about HT speaker placement as you do for a 2-channel music system. Yes, following good speaker-placement rules will help, but the nature of the sound, and the array of speakers is very different for HT.
    • Tweeters at the same height - I like this approach, even for the rear speakers. Some swear by the Dolby guidelines of putting the rears 2-3 feet above your head, but these recomendations have not changed since the ProLogic days.
    • Center Speaker - Up and Forward - Pull the face of the center speaker forward so that it over-hangs the front of the TV about 1/4 inch or .2 cm. Do not make it flush, or pushed back. Also, get the center speaker up off the TV cabinent. Rubber door-wedges make good feet and give you a tilt, or you can use rubber erasers or wooden dowels. The goal is to de-couple the speaker cabinent from the TV cabinent.
    • Pull the L/R speakers into the room. Draw a rough circle with your central listening position at the center. Try to pull the front 3 speakers forward so that the tweeters are all on this circle. Now you dont need to worry about front time-delays.
    • Angle the L/R speakers - Some toe-in of the L/R speakers is recommended. I like to use a laser-pointer to see where the speakers are pointing. You have 3 options here:
      1. Angle the speakers so the sound intersects about 1-2 feet in front of the listening position. This is the classic music adjustment to create a center image.
      2. Angle the speakers so the sound intersects exactly at the listening position.
      3. Angle the speakers so the sound intersects 1-2 feet behind the central position.
      You just have to try all 3 and decide what sounds best for your speakers and room.[/list=a]
      Hope this helps.
     

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