Front Projector for someone who knows nothing about video

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Matt*B, May 17, 2005.

  1. Matt*B

    Matt*B Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey all,

    I am huge into the home theater scene, and plan on getting a Mits: ws-65315, which is a great TV - but since i have never dealt with projectors, i don't know much about them...that's why i am asking you...

    I have a friend who is interested in a Front projector for his basement. Now, he doesn't know the difference between s-video and RCA input, so that should set the playing field. Anyway, he said he was looking at the toshiba s20u. The max res. is 800x600 and since it's only $700, I would think that it is made for computer presentations. However, since it has rca and svideo input, it could be used for dvd's and TV.

    What exactly is the diff. between these "cheap" $700 units that are mostly made for computers and the $1500+ ones that are clearly made for home theater?

    If the projector doesn't have 3:2 pulldown, will it still be able to show movies in widescreen properly? I feel silly knowing so much about everything else, and nothing about projectors....

    once again, if he's not a videophile, will this projector make him happy? I just would like to know what distinguishes the low end computer models from the high end theater models....

    Thanks guys,

    Matt
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    In basic terms, most "persentation" projectors have a 4x3 aspect ratio (800x600, 640x480 for example) and many projectors used for HT today have 16x9 aspect ratios, ideal for widescreen movies and HDef. Many of the presentation projectors have minimal inputs as well though not always. The absolute bare bones is composite and s-video but component and dvi are nice to have. Also, most presentation projectors are bright, which they need to be, so that the image can be viewed in a room with partial light. The downside is that most have poor contrast ratios so that the "blacks" appear more gray than black. This can be the downfall if viewing movies that require a lot of shadow detail like Dark City for instance.

    Now the S20U also has component which would be a preferrable video input to use if your friend's TV has component outputs. Is there any chance that he can demo the unit before purchase. If so, tell him to watch the end credits (black screen, white lettering) for any "rainbow effect".
     
  3. James Phung

    James Phung Second Unit

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    For $700, he can get something like the Infocus x1 (infocus 4800) that would likely perform better.
     
  4. Jim Mcc

    Jim Mcc Producer

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    I also highly recommend the X1. I've had mine for about 7 months and it's great, especially for the price. Check out Google.com.
     

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